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Album anfc Program 



SWEDISH DAY 



San Diego, California 



June 24-25, 1916 



M^^H 



Qrogram 



Saturday, June 24th, 1916 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DAY, CONSUL NILS MALMBERG 

1 P. M. PARADE, to the Exposition Grounds, starting from the San Diego 

Courthouse 

Mr. Torsten Meyerhoffer will accompany the parade in his aeroplane 

2 P. M. Exercises at the Spreckels outdoor organ grandstand (and in the Ex- 

position grounds) 

1. Selected Swedish National Airs Dr. Stewart 

2. Song, "Hor oss Svea" - - The Male Chorus 

3. Address of Welcome .Consul Nils Malmberg 

4. Song, "Du Gamls, Du Fria" Swedish Day Mixed Chorus 

5. Address of Welcome Honorable E. M, Capps, Mayor of San Diego 

6. Solo, Soprano Miss Lillian Backstrand 

7. Address Carl H, Heilbron, Vice President of the P. C. I. Exposition 

8. Sta Stark, Du Ljuseto-riddarvakt The Male Chorus 

9. Address Consul G. Eckdahl 

10. Song, "Mandom, Mod och Morske Man" Swedish Day Mixed Chorus 

1 1. Address of the day Rev. T. S. Johnstone, B. D. 

12. Song, "Vart Land, Vart Land" Swedish Day Mixed Chorus 

13. Address Honorable Senator Edgard Luce 

14. "America" (unison) Led by The Male Chorus 

6-8 P. M. RECEPTION in Southern California Counties Building. 
8 P. M. Banquet in Cristobal Cafe. 

Sunday, June 25th, 1916 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DAY, CONSUL G. ECKDAHL 
10:30 A. M. RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

Rev. V. E. Hedberg, presiding. Short sermons by different ministers. Singing by the 
Swedish Day Mixed Chorus and Soloists 

7 P. M. GRAND CONCERT at the famous U. S. Grant Hotel Auditorium. 

( I 800 free seats) 

1. Song, "Harliga Land;" "Sverige ar Mitt Allt pa Jorden"--The Male Chorus 

2. Patriotic Address Mr. Herman Bostrom 

3. Klara Stjarna The Swedish Day Mixed Chorus 

4. Solo, (baritone) Mr. Alfred Anderson 

5. Address Rev, J, A. Carlson 

6. Solo (soprano) Mrs. Robert Parker-Sheldon 

7. "Vart Land. Vart Land" The Swedish Day Mixed Chorus 

8. Solo (baritone) - Mr. C. Peterson 

9. Address - Dr. Albert E. Wilson 

10. Closing Remarks Consul G. Eckdahl 

I 1. Song, "Skona Maj," "Glad Sasom Fageln" The Male Chorus 

12. "Star Spangled Banner" The Male Chorus 




Kind Gustavcl" of Sweden President Wilso 



g»nipittslt IaQ, 3ma 24-25, 191fi 



By Herman Bostrom 



June 24 is Mid-summer Day. This is a greatly cherished and much-loved 
day among the Swedish people both in this country and in our Fatherland. It 
is customary to commemorate this day by joyous festivities and merrymaking 
out in the open. The Winter having given way, young and old rejoice and 
partake in festive celebrations. This year an exceptional opportunity is offered 
the Swedish and Swedish-American people in this and other states to partake 
in the celebration of the "Swedish Day** at the Panama-California Interna- 
tional Exposition at San Diego on June 24 and 25. 

"Civilized Europe" is now in the midst of the most awful and barbarous 
war the world has ever seen, a conflict growing more stupendous every day, 
the result of which is far wider and more terrible than any fanatic heretofore 
dared dream. The Swedish people at home and their government have not 
thought themselves big enough to be judges of the belligerent forces engaged 
in this struggle. They have not tried to judge without real knowledge as to 
where the blame lays. All their efforts have, however, been along the lines 
of peace, and happiness. They have tried to bring about a reconciliation of 
the belligerents and have been very careful to watch their own neutrality and 
avoid any breach or violation of same. They have declared for neutrality 
and will probably stand by that declaration to the end. 

The Swedish people have been agitators of wars in former years, but 
during the last century they have greatly changed their opinions and traditions 
about war and its results, and instead of trying to acquire the territory and 



property of other peoples they have been trying to expand in knowledge and 
works of peace. The days of Gustav Adolphus and King Charles were 
days of war and conquest. Individual courage and strength were then the 
main essentials. During the reign of Gustavus the 5 th all these things have 
greatly changed. This is a time of work and serious thought, a time when we 
have good statesmanship to depend upon, and more than ever, we depend 
upon love to all mankind, but above all — good common sense. The duty of 
Sweden is to stand neutral as long as it is possible, and we sincerely hope 
that this may always be possible, but we would not say that the nation is for- 
getting to prepare. Sweden today is prepared as much as possible. It can 
put 600,000 men in the field immediately and I am sure we can look to the 
future with great trust and confidence even though we should be brought into 
the war, which God forbid ! 

The Swedes are mostly honest and straight-forward men and we Swedish- 
Americans should not be afraid to say that we still have a warm feeling for 
the country of our fore-fathers. We must stick to the truth but we must also 
respect our President's wishes and instructions concerning hyphenated Amer- 
canism in every possible way. A man should stand by his wife and family 
first but there is no good reason why he should not love his parents also.. 
Sweden is still loved and respected amongst the millions of Swedish-Amer- 
icans who have been adopted by these free states of America, but we Swedish- 
Americans want it thoroughly understood that we are loyal citizens of the 
United States in political and social life, and believe that we so stand in the 
eyes and judgment of the American born people. Our loyalty has never been 
questioned in all these long years. We strive to be the most loyal of the loyal 
and the most honorable of the honorable amongst the citizens of this great 
republic. With all the strength of our souls and bodies we defy any one to 
state anything to the contrary, or that the Star Spangled Banner has any better 
or more courageous defenders than those through whose veins flows Swedish 
blood. AMERICA FIRST is our motto and one for which we Swedes all 
stand today, but if American patriotism means that we should forget all about 
our childhood days and all about our mother country, then I am afraid we 
shall have to very respectfully, but nevertheless firmly, stand out against such 
instructions. 

Every one of us ought to be careful, both Americans and coming Amer- 
icans, not to fix our ideas of Americanism prematurely. Everything good about 
us — our ideals — our principles, we have brought with us from our mother 
country, and instead of throwing these things away we ought to cherish and 
use them in the service and for the good of this, our great American adopted 
country. Every good and patriotic Swede has the best chance in the world 
of becoming a good American citizen, ought to adopt this country for his 
own and ought to be for America first, last and all the time, but this does not 
prevent him in any way from being proud of Sweden and its people. 

HISTORY OF THE SWEDISH DAY 

As early as during the year of 1915 it had been suggested that arrange- 
ments be made for a great Swedish-American Festival to be held at the San 
Diego Exposition, but in order not to hamper or interfere with the Swedish 
Festivals at San Francisco, nothing was done at that time. The question was 
taken up later through a letter in our Swedish newspaper here in town by B. 
F, Randell. The first meeting was called together in Los Angeles with del- 
egates representing all the churches and societies of Southern California, and 
it was at that meeting it was decided to make arrangements for a great Swedish 
festival to be held on the 24th and 25th days of June, 1916. A Nomination 
Committee of 1 was then and there elected and these 1 representatives nom- 
inated all the officers and various committees for the coming great festival. 




NILS MALMBERG 

President of the Committee 

Swedish V. Consul 

San Diego, Cal. 



Mr. Malmberg was born in Hel- 
singborg, Sweden, August 1 4th, 
1868. He came to the United 
States in 1 888 and located first at 
Marcus, Iowa. Two months later he 
came to San Diego, Cal., where he 
has resided ever since. Mr. Malm- 
berg is one of the leading painting 
contractors in San Diego. He was 
appointed vice consul of Sweden, 
September 12, 1908. He has been 
a member of the city council of San 
Diego. He is a 32nd degree Free 
Mason, and a member of different 
local fraternal and commercial or- 
ganizations. 

It is due to a great extent to Mr. 
Malmberg and other representative 
Swedes in San Diego that the Swed- 
ish people there enjoy the high stand- 
ing and good will of the citizens of 
San Diego. 

As president of the Swedish Day 
committe of San Diego he deserves 
a great deal of credit for the suc- 
cessful work accomplished. 




GOTTLIEB ECKDAHL 

President of the Committee 
Swedish V. Consul 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Mr. Eckdahl was born in Helsing- 
borg, Sweden, September 6, 1869, 
came to the United States in 1888, 
and settled in Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
He arrived in Los Angeles in De- 
cember, 1895, and has resided here 
ever since ; became the publisher and 
business manager of the California 
Journal, was appointed a deputy in 
the city and county assessor's of- 
fice for seven years and has been in 
Real Estate and Insurance business 
for the past ten years. 

He is one of the organizers of the 
Swedish-American National League 
of Los Angeles and has been its 
president for two terms; is a mem- 
ber of different local, fraternal and 
commercial organizations and has 
been the chairman of the board of 
trustees for the Swedish Lutheran 
church for a number of years. Mr. 
Eckdahl has always been greatly in- 
terested in anything concerning the 
welfare of the Swedish Colony and 
has frequently been a leader and sup- 
porter of different Swedish under- 
takings in Los Angeles. He was ap- 
pointed vice consul for Sweden, 
December 31, 1912. As the presi- 
dent of the Committee for the cele- 
bration of the Swedish Day he is 
deserving a great deal of credit for 
the successful work accomplished. 



At that meeting it was also decided to hold a great mass meeting in the Flower 
Auditorium in Los Angeles. At this mass meeting our present officers and 
committee members were elected, in accordance with recommendations made 
by the Nominating Committee. Something good had been achieved. The 
people in the churches and outside of the churches worked together harmoni- 
ously and in a friendly manner, with but a single thought in mind — the com- 
mon interests of the Swedish population of California and other states of the 
Union. 

As the time drew near the various committees in both Los Angeles and 
San Diego met and organized. Our friends in San Diego had already gotten a 
promise from the Exposition Officials to set aside June 24th and 25th as Offi- 
cial days for a Swedish Day Festival at San Diego. 

The Committee, as a whole, hereby 
desires to thank the Exposition Officials 
one and all, and especially do we ex- 
tend our sincere thanks to our true 
friend, the Vice-President of the Expo- 
sition, Carl H. Heilbron. 

The work continued with great 
haste in both Los Angeles and San 
Diego and all through Southern Cali- 
fornia. It was decided to send a dele- 
gation of three from the Los Angeles 
Committee to represent it at the San 
Diego Executive Committee's meeting 
to work out the plans for the coming 
celebration. This committee was com- 
posed of Vice Counsul G. Eckdahl, Al- 
fred Haij and Herman Bostrom. The 
meeting was held in San Diego and 
lasted for two days. The others pres- 
ent at the meeting were the following 
members from the San Diego Execu- 
tive Committee: Vice Counsul N. 
Malmberg, Rev. John Carlson, Gott- 
fred Anderson, Jonas Hanson, O. W. 
Johnson, Carl Johnson, Hjalmar Swen- 
son, R. Malmberg, Gustav Carlson, A. 

Landeen and Alfred Anderson. A great deal of work was accomplished at 
the meeting. After the meeting, a dinner was given by Vice President Heil- 
bron at the Christobal Cafe for the delegates from Los Angeles and members 
of the Committee from San Diego. From that time on there was but one 
thought in the minds of the Special Committees and the Executive Commit- 
tees and that was to make the festival a grand success. Meetings were held 
almost every week, both in Los Angeles and San Diego, and on May 1 3th we 
had a meeting in Los Angeles together with the San Diego Executive Com- 
mittee, at which meeting a decision was made as to how to arrange the pro- 
grams, etc., for the festival. 

Saturday, June I Oth, the Los Angeles Committee gave an automobile 
parade through the streets of the city of Los Angeles. There was a large num- 
ber of machines in this parade, making quite a demonstration and announcing 
the day and date of the Festival in every way possible. Pennants with the 
inscription "SVENSKA DAGEN 1916" in yellow and blue colors were made 
specially for this occasion and American and Swedish colors were displayed 
on every hand. 

At the coming Swedish Day everybody will wear a beautiful souvenir 




I ARL H. UKILBKuN. 
Vice President of Panama California Inter- 
national Exposition 



Executive Committee 




RevVE.H?dber6 RevI 5. Johnston 

Ma? Pre>!> iden t /tee -President 



_|L_ 

Alfred Hem 

frce-7>resJd<rnf J 




v. Consul G. Zckdahl 

Pmsi dent' 




v Con%d Nils Maimers 




"Rev J. A. Carlson 

/7ce- President 




badge bearing the Swedish coat-of-arms at the top and below the official expo- 
sition medal, held together with a beautiful yellow and blue ribbon. 

It would take a large volume rilled from cover to cover to adequately tell 
of the work accomplished by the various officials and committees, their self- 
sacrifices and earnest efforts put forth to make this the greatest of all Swedish 
Days in the history of America. May the results of their efforts long live in 
the history of California and in hearts of our Swedish population all over the 
United States. 

In regard to the San Diego Committee a great many good things can be 
said concerning their work and the large number of details they have had to 
look after. A whole page could be written about each one of them without 
fear of praising them too much. Our relations with them have been the most 
pleasant and we know we can count on them in future as our friends. I am 
very sorry they have not sent in a few biographies of themselves, as I would 
have been very much pleased to have included them in this album, but as they 
have not yet been received, the album will probably have to go to print before 
they can be obtained. 

The largest part of the work and responsibility in San Diego, as you 
all know, rested upon the shoulders of a few men. First among these is our 
untiring Vice Counsul Nils Malmberg. He is the man who from the start saved 
neither time nor money to make the Swedish Day Festival a success. His 
thoughts for months past have been centered entirely upon the Swedish Day. 
Mr. Gottfred Anderson, Mr. Jonas Hanson, Rev. John Carlson, Rev. E. J. 
Forsberg, Mr. O. W. Johnson, Mr. R. Malmberg, Mr. H. Swenson, Mr. Carl 
Johnson, Mr. C. T. Engmarck, Mr. Alfred Anderson, Mr. A. Landeen, Mr. 
Gustav Carlson and Mr. August Lufling are the men, as far as I know, who 
have had the greatest responsibility in San Diego and who have devoted much 
of their time in the interest of this day to make it a success and a pleasant 
memory for all time to come. 

The Swedes of Los Angeles and other parts of Southern California tender 
these gentlemen their sincere thanks. The Committee for Los Angeles, its 
suburbs and surrounding cities, have been doing great work all the way 
through. The chairman of the committee, Consul G. Eckdahl, is, one who has 
done more than his part. His business and other affairs have been set aside 
in the interest of the day during all these months and he deserves a great deal 
of credit for all he has done in our common interests. Nobody mentioned and 
nobody forgotten, I will state that this committee as a whole has displayed 
some wonderful team work, and we have also received many a helping hand 
from different people not belonging to the committee. 

The preliminary work for the Swedish Day and our national festivities 
at San Diego has been accomplished. Work and good will have shown their 
results. The success of this day is of greater importance to the Swedish-Amer- 
ican population of Southern California than twenty-five years of previous 
efforts to bring our countrymen together. We have this year laid a strong 
and enduring foundation for greater love of our friends and on this founda- 
tion we will hereafter build and grow strong. We believe in ourselves and if 
we live and work for our common interests in the community, we will succeed 
in getting what we are entitled to. We believe in love, in brotherhood, in 
equality and a good understanding between ourselves. We hope that with 
this Swedish Day will come a new awakening amongst our countrymen to a 
higher and better interest in ourselves and interest in society. We have accom- 
plished this Swedish Day with the fullest harmony and friendship prevailing 
between all parties interested. We ought to keep it and thereby better our 
own characters, our own knowledge and our own understanding. We ought 
to appreciate the knowledge we have gained in our young days at home and 
in our school days. We ought to be active members in our Swedish churches 



Executive Committee 



hrlhur Eriekwn 




roe n son Therval! £ Ncrdrum 

75 n^ 77 c/a i Sec re 1aru 







JorJ* rfoorn 

d$s¥ $in Secreferu 




CXW, Johnson 



Car] T tftjen wal 1 M i < 



•Wilson 

cfCTlf 



and societies, and in that way endeavor to be a benefit and help to our fellow 
citizens. "United we stand, divided we fall." The Swedish-American popu- 
lation of Southern California is great and strong enough to be a powerful work- 
ing force, but to expend and use our strength in the interest of good, we must 
become filled with zeal and enthusiasm and this enthusiasm should be the 
motive power in all our actions. We must come to understand that our inter- 
ests are mutual and common. We must meet on a basis of equality and broth- 
erly friendliness, and if we so do, then we are strong enough to take care of 
our own troubles easily and carry them to a successful end. Swedish churches, 
Swedish societies, Swedish business enterprises, both employers and employees 
from beginning to the end are more or less dependent upon one another, one 
enterprise often depending on the success and helping hand of some other 
enterprise. We are all working for the advancement and success of the Swed- 
ish population in the United States of America. We should be loyal in every 
way to our own adopted land — America — but once more let me remind you 
that we should never forget that we are also children of our fathers and moth- 
ers and ought to be proud of our antecedence and of our dear Fatherland, the 
land of the midnight sun and the beautiful land of the always free and civilized 
Sweden. 





m 





LILLIAN J. BACKSTRAND, 
Teacher of Voice 

College of Music 

University of Southern California 

400 Mason Opera House Bldg. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



ALEX. OLSON, 

Editor and Publisher 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Executive Committee 




Julius I. En^mark. 



San Diego Exposition 

ANEW EXPOSITION, known as the "Panama-California International Exposition," 
has been built on the 1915 Exposition in Balboa Park. Participation by nineteen gov- 
ernments, seven Western states, and sixteen California counties has lifted San Diego's 
beautiful attraction to the plane of International Expositions, where it is more than holding 
its own. *^ 

San Diego enjoyed one of the greatest crowds in her history, and the events of the 
rirst few months have been fitting auguries of the wonderful year that is to crown the great 
enterprise. 

The Canadian exhibit requires an entire building. This attractive feature was brought 
from the San Francisco exposition intact, and has been given an entire building on the San 
Diego Exposition grounds. The wonderful French display, valued at more than a million 
dollars, is housed in the California building; Germany, Austria and Italy are beautifully 
represented in the Foreign and Domestic Products building; the Pan- Pacific building in- 
cludes displays of Hawaii, New Zealand, Australia, the Philippnies, Alaska and other 
Pacific commonwealths. 

The United States government display requires three buildings. The Sacramento build- 
ing and the Nevada building of 1915 have been given over to the government, and the Ex- 
position built a new structure 102 by 110 feet for the accommodation of the aquarium ex- 
hibit of the United States fisheries. A thousand of the 4th Regiment U. S. Marines, several 
companies of the First U. S. Cavalry, and a battalion of infantry have been sent to the Ex- 
position for the year. Many government bands will play during the period. 

Tommasino's Royal Italian Band is the Exposition's official band; the famous Spanish 
dancers and singers have returned to add their melodies and their quaint attractiveness to 
the grounds; the world's greatest outdoor pipe organ renders daily concerts; special events, 
including automobile races, model aeroplane meets, athletic contests and automobile demon- 
strations are on the daily programs. Outdoor performances are presented during the balmy 
evenings in the Exposition's beautiful courts; the "Court of Leap Year" is one of the at- 
tractive spots for Exposition visitors; "Miss San Diego— 1916" hold receptions; and open- 
air dancing is enjoyed in the plazas every afternoon and evening. 

Special recognition is given automobilists during the year, and machines are admitted to the 
grounds for 25c and 24 hours' free parking is permitted. 

The Isthmus is completely reorganized and only the best of the 1915 shows remain, to which have 
been added many new amusements, including the best of those seen on the Zone at San Francisco. 
The Painted Desert, War of the Worlds, Panama Canal, Hawaiian Village, Racing Coasters, Captain, 
"Elizabeth," "Madame Ellis," Robinson's Educated Animals, Girl Shows, Alligator Farm, Paris After 
Midnight, Jerusalem, the Gem Mine and many others are catering to the amusement-loving public. 
Places to eat on the grounds are numerous, and meals may be had at any price, to please any purse. 
Except for attractions on the Isthmus, there are no charges for visiting any Exposition buildings or 

'Our Swedish people will certainly enjoy a long stay in San Diego and this beautiful 
Exposition, 





G, A. DAVIDSON 
President 



H. J. PENFOLD 
Secretary 




M.C.Tfefferkom 



son ' Alfred. Hoffsirf 



_ ...„ .. 




jpOS ANGELES, the "City of 
jjy, the Angels" — or to give the 
sonorous Spanish title, **Nu- 
estra Senora la Reina de Los An- 
geles" — the Wonder City of the 
United States, is the most talked- 
of city on the continent. Indeed, 
its fame has spread all over the 
world. A city that increases its 
population within the short period 
of thirty years from 10,000 to 
550,000 is certainly not in the 
ordinary class. 

There are three leading feat- 
ures that have contributed to this 
growth — climate, soil and loca- 
tion. Any one of these advantages 
would be sufficient to build up a 
large city, but taken together they 
insure the future of Los Angeles 
as the metropolis of the South- 
west. 

Los Angeles was founded on 
September 4, 1 78 1 , by a small 
band of pobladores, or colonists, 
who had been recruited in the 
Mexican States of Sinaloa and 
Sonora, and brought here under 
command of a government officer, 
to found an agricultural colony, 
for the purpose of raising produce 
for the soldiers at the presidios. 
They were a mixed class, com- 
posed of one European, seventy- 
two Spanish-Americans, seven 
Indians, twenty-two mulattoes 
and thirty-nine Mestizos. As re- 
cently as 1831, fifty years after 
the founding of the pueblo, the 
population was only 7 70. In Jan- 
uary, 184 7, the population was 
1,500. 

That Los Angeles is, and will 
always remain, the commercial 
metropolis of Southern California, 
admits of no doubt. The City 
possesses the great natural ad- 
vantage of being located on the 
shortest route, by the easiest 
grades, between the Pacific and 
the Atlantic oceans. The princi- 
pal articles of export are fruits, 
fresh and dried ; vegetables of 
great variety, beans, wine and 
brandy, wool, honey, canned 
goods, sugar, olives, wheat, corn, 
barley, petroleum, cotton and by- 
products. 



Commrftee Members 




Prof Mj pelin Prof ifitlnfcan Hi Iberz Albin E^elbreckt 

Direct* iW 





BROADWAY, SAN DiEGO 

SAN DIEGO 

SAN DIEGO (St. James) was founded by Alonzo Erastus Horton in 
1867. Its location is sanitary and exceptionally attractive, admirably adapted 
for ocean commerce, and hundreds of charming homes fill up block after 
block, the commanding positions being occupied by stately residences, whose 
view takes in the ocean, bay, and in the distance, toward the south, may be 
seen the mountains of Old Mexico. 

It has substantial and attractive business buildings, up-to-date stores, 
hotels and restaurants, fine opera houses and theatres, fine church edifices of 
various denominations, and an excellent public school system. Secret and 
benevolent societies have their lodge rooms, and some of the societies own 
the magnificent structures in which they meet. Notably among these are the 
Masonic, Elks and Knights of Pythias buildings, which are conceded to be 
among the finest in the country. Three daily papers — one morning (The 
Union) and two evening (The Tribune and The Sun), several weekly and 
monthly publications afford a general news service that is complete and 
reliable. 



Reception Committee ~ 




By Rev. T. S. Johnston 

A very interesting article might have been written on this subject if time 
had permitted some closer investigation as to church work in Southern Cali- 
fornia, but the late assignment of this topic and other pressing duties of the 




ANGELICA SWEDISH LUTHERAN CHURCH 

REV. T. S. JOHNSTON, B. D., Pastor 
1 7th and Hope Streets, Los Angeles 

writer make it impossible to gather detailed and reliable information, hence 

only a brief sketch about the church work in Los Angeles can be submitted. 

From what we have been able to glean from individuals we understand 

that organized church work was started among the Baptists in May, 1887, 




SWEDISH BAPTIST CHURCH 

REV. V. E. HEDBERG, Pastor 
West Eleventh and Denver Streets 



BZfl 



jj pown Business and Profession j, 




5u>an JTurnblacf 

?n bJisbrr - 5 yen ska. A mer/Aamto 
foslen -rtinnrdpolh tfirrn. 



sh C&1, 




SWEDISH TABERNACLE 

REV. T. O. KLING, Pastor 
Lincoln and Francisco Streets 



by the Methodists the same year in December, by the Lutherans in February, 
1888, by the Mission Friends (Swedish Covenant) in August, 1888, and by 
the Free Missions in 1912 or 1913. Some preliminary work had, of course, 
been done by these respective bodies prior to the organization of these 
churches. It might be safe to say that the church work in Los Angeles started 
about thirty years ago. 

The beginning was small and the work was carried on under a great 
many difficulties, owing to various causes: the west coast being far separated 
from the middle and eastern states isolated the work and the workers out 
here and made it very difficult to secure men for the small struggling missions; 
another difficulty was the uncertainty of the new settlers as to whether they 
would remain out here or not. Many of these new comers moved from place 
to place after having come out here; a third difficulty was the lack of financial 
support. The new settlers had a severe struggle for existence and very little 
could be spared for the church work. We feel more or less hampered in 
the work even now because of these very causes, and yet we rejoice over the 
advancement of the Kingdom of God among our countrymen. The number 
of paying members is about 1 ,500; these together with their children constitute 
a membership of about 2,000 in the five Swedish churches in Los Angeles. 

We have been told that there are in the neighborhood of 10,000 foreign 
and native born Swedish people in Los Angeles. If this is true, we realize the 
great work yet to be carried on by the Swedish churches in Los Angeles. We 
are happy to know that aggressive and well planned work is now being done, 
and we are hopeful for the future. 

A spirit of friendship and co-operation exists among the pastors and the 
respective churches in Los Angeles. We have felt this on several occasions 
and we remember with fondness the kind welcome accorded us on our arrival 
here last fall. 

We also have a Swedish Ministerial Association, where the pastors come 
together and discuss questions of mutual interest. 

Last but not least have we experienced a strong bond of union among 
the churches in our deliberations and preparations relative to the Swedish Day 
at San Diego. As we have been working on different committees together 
we have felt that we have much in common and that we are mutually interested 
in the welfare of all our countrymen. We sincerely hope that this opportunity 
of working together for the common good of our Swedish people may enable 
us all to realize our own strength and respective duties. May it be our effort 
to elevate the Swedish name and to develop everything that is best in us. 




SWEDISH METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

REV. T. O. LINSTRUM, Pastor 
Los Angeles and 15 th Streets, Los Angeles 



: o 




DR. P. O. SUNDIN 

H. W. HELLMAN BLDG. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



F. E. BERGE, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon 

Office, 919 Hollingsworth Bldg. 

Sixth and Hill Streets 

Phones: F 5004. Main 963 Hours 3 to 5 

Residence: 1827 Eleventh Avenue, Phone 74279 

LOS ANGELES 



THE DISTRICT LODGE 



Southern California 

No. 15 




VASA Order 
of America 





HJALMAR JOHNSON 
District Master 



JOHN A. FREBERG 
District Secretary 



This order is today the largest and the strongest Swedish Fraternal Society in Amer- 
ica. We ask you to consider becoming a member and thereby aid the good cause in which 
we are engaged. We have now the following five lodges in our district and you are hereby 
invited to be a member in any one of them. 



NORDSTJERMAN LODGE, NO. 106 

Meets in Flower Auditorium 

1 8th and Flower Streets 

Every Tuesday at 8 p. m. 

Los Angeles 



DROTT LODGE, NO. 335 

Meets every 1st and 3rd Thursday 

In Flower Audiotrium 

1 8th and Flower Sts 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



SKANDIA LODGE NO. 247 

Meets Maccabee Hall 

Colorado Street 

Every 2nd and 4th Thursday 

Pasadena 



GUSTAF V. LODGE NO. 175 

Meets every 1st and 3rd Thursday 

In Castle Hall, 63 1 6th St. 

San Diego 



VIKING LODGE NO. 256 

Meets every 2nd and 4th Wednesday 

In Red Man's Hall 

I28V 2 6th Street 

San Pedro 




Geo 


Hanson 


Trop.Jhoh^rniix C<xie 
v5c>77 T)iardo 



Consulting £n^jne<rr 



Archiieci-LosAnceks 
o 




TRAVEL BY AUTO 



over the paved highways ot 
Southern California. Exper- 
ienced, careful drivers, whose first consideration is the safety and comfort of 
our patrons. We operate NEW Six Cylinder seven-passenger cars daily to 
San Diego, Santa Barbara, Bakersfield and San Francisco. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA STAGE CO. 

643 South Spring Street, Los Angeles Tel. Main 25 11 ; Home F4775 

Home A-3729 Main 9400 

Strictly Modern Rooms Single and En Suite Private Telephones 

Ground Floor Lobby Billiard Hall 

Close to the "Star Garage" 

HOTEL CONGRESS 

A. M. CROW, Proprietor 
CORNER EIGHTH AND FLOWER STREETS 

Entrance 729 West 8th 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

^^^4S=04^0^o:v :o::o o :<:■ o Ctttt ■:• v d#a 



ANTON C. OLSON 

1 101 Maple Avenue 

Importers of All Kinds of 

SCANDINAVIAN SPECIALTIES 

Up-to-Date Grocery Store 

Prices always the lowest 



OFFICE PHONES: 
Main 42 ! 4, F 42 I 4 



RESIDENCE PHONE 

West 5492 




Wm. E. Peterson 

SWEDISH FUNERAL 
DIRECTOR 

1 25 South Grand Avenue 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Ambulance service night or day 
Lady attendant 



Women's Dept: Men's Dept: 

F6125 F 1043, Main 5098 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



THE SULTAN 
TURKISH BATHS 



SIXTH AND HILL STREET 
LOS ANGELES 



NEW 

Women's Department opens June 25 

with Hot Rooms 

Steam Rooms 

and Plunge 



$50 REWARD FOR ANY MOUTH 
WE CANNOT FIT 

Or for any dental operation we cannot 
perform painlessly 




Extraction FREE When Plates Are Ordered. All Work 
Guaranteed 

Plates, $5.00; Crowns, $4.00 and Up; Fillings, 50c and Up; 
Bridgework, $4.00 and Up 

Treatments, 50c 
Open Evenings Phone A 2511 

Don't conclude because you have tried (capable) den- 
tists without success that your case is hopeless. Some mouths 
are hard to fit, but few are impossible. Doubtless your plate 
troubles are due to unskilled judgment and cheap workman- 
ship. In such cases we seldom fail to give "Satisfaction." Fif- 
teen years experience and the largest practice in the city assure 
you we know how to successfully treat your teeth no matter 
what your trouble. We specialize on painless extraction with 
Vitalized Air, the safest method known, consequently you es- 
cape any chance of the after-effects so common where drugs 
are indiscriminately administered. Ask about our special treat- 
ment for Pyorrhoea (loose teeth.) 

LADY ATTENDANT 

Dr.T. W.YOUNG and ASSOCIATES 

S. W. Cor. 7th and Broadway 



the new 



300 rooms 



Maryland Hotel 

SAN DIEGO 
SIXTH, SEVENTH AND "F" STREETS 

The Maryland Hotel was opened March 15, 1916. Here you will enjoy every comfort 
at no embarrassment to your purse. Under the management of Omer E. Lilly, the reputa- 
tion of this hotel is being built around Comfort and Service. 

The MARYLAND occupies a 400-foot frontage east, south and west. There are 300 
sunny, airy rooms. Electric car lines to the Exposition pass the door; and all points of 
interest are conveniently accessible. 



TARIFF: 



Rooms with Toilet and Lavatory: 

One Person, per day $1.00 up 

Two Persons, per day._ $1.50 up 



Rooms with Bath or Shower: 

One Person, per day $1.50 up 

Two Persons, per day $2.50 up 



SPECIAL RATES TO PERMANENT GUESTS 
Special Conveniences for Commercial Travelers. Large Sample Rooms with Baths. 

"THE ATTENTIVE HOTEL" 

OMER E. LILLY, Manager 



John S. Mitchell, President and Manager 

Chas. D. Smead, Assistant Manager 

Mowatt M. Mitchell, V. P. and Treas. g 



Hollenbeck Hotel and Cafe 

S. W. Corner Spring and Second Sts. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

HOLLENBECK HOTEL CO., Proprietors 
Telephones: Home 10022, Main 443 

Angelus Hotel Grill 

A quiet, restful place and good 
things to eat 



FOURTH AND SPRING STREETS 
Fourth Street at Olive 



| 


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s 





Hotel Fremont 



4th Street at Olive 

The most central located family 
hotel in Los Angeles, two blocks 
from the shopping center; every 
room an outside room, many en 
suite with bath, beautiful garden, 
porches. An ideal hotel of comfort 
and refinement. 

We solicit your patronage and 
kind consideration. 

RATES 

Single room for one, $1.00 the day. 
Single room for two, $1.50. 
Single room for one, with bath, $l.50-$2. 
Single room for two, with bath, $2-$3. 
Also two and 3 room Suites with bath. 



< 

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HOTEL MUNN 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
Olive St. and 5th, at Central Park 



=ft 



5 

o 



Classy down town family hotel. High J* 
class location. Best service. Convenient ^ 

to ladies' shopping district, theatres and " 

A 
excursions. " 

o 

RATES: Single 75r. double $1.00; with O 

privale bath, $125, $1.50 and $2 g 

Managed by owner q 

s 



HOTEL HAYWARD 

Absolutely Fireproof 
H. C. FRYMAN, Proprietor 

k 



Up-to-Date Dress Suits for Rent, 9, 
$1.00 per day 

COHEN'S 

803J/ 2 South Spring St. 




SPRING 8 SIXTH STS. 

Swedish people welcome 

Rates: $1.00 and Up 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



:■ ■:• : 
Place Your 

Fire, Automobile and 
Accident Insurance 

With C. C. ADOPHSEN, Manager 
WESTERN INSURANCE AGENCY 

We will place your Insurance with reliable Companies 



G. ECKDAHL 



Phone A 5458 



424 Marsh-Strong Building 



"Avoid trouble by having your Insurance written by men who know.* 



®hr SnurMsb-Amertratt National league 

nf g>mttifprn (California 

By SWAN WILSON 

The Swedish -American League of Southern California was founded the 7th of De- 
cember, 1908, by a few patriotic Swedish-American citizens of Los Angeles and with the 
most noble thoughts in view, to-wit: The preservation of the Swedish language, Swedish 
songs, and folklore, the preservation of love for the old homeland and its customs and with 
the noble intention to get Swedish literature introduced in our public libraries and further, 
to try to help all our Swedish fellow-men when in need and, together with delegates from 
the different churches and societies, work together for the welfare and benefit of all and 
thereby inspire respect and honor for the Swedish population in our beloved adopted 
country, United States. 

During its existence of eight years, has many noble deeds been done many meet- 
ings, festivals and picnics have been arranged, many poor families have received help. 
Several of our countrymen have through the League been placed in positions in different 

spheres of life the public library has added about 200 volumes of Swedish literature in 

the Swedish language many a stranger traveling through California has been received 

and entertained by the League and thus we can look backwards with satisfaction and 
honor upon the years gone by and trust that our fellowmen are satisfied with the League 
and its noble intentions! 

It would be a pleasure if more of our fellowmen and ladies would join us, as we 
need everybody's help. All honest, respectable Swedish speaking men and women are 
eligible to membership and the cost is a mere bagatele. Our members and our executive 
committee are composed of men and women of good standing in the community that 
always will do their duty without fear or favor and are not ashamed of being "Swedish- 
Americans." 

The Executive Committee for this year is as follows: Prof. Percy Nilsson, President; 
Miss Minnie Wilson, Vice President; Th. L. Nerdrum, Record Sec; Fritz Rappe, Financial 
Secretary; P. B. Person, Treasurer; Vice Consul G. Eckdahl, Prof. C. A. Kunou, Olof 
Johnson, Swan Wilson, C. J. Tornquist, S. J. Jacobson, Prof. Alb, E. Wilson, C A. John- 
son, Alf. Haij, C. J. Nordquist, Rud Hammar, Mrs. Percy Nilsson and Mrs. Niola Palmer. 

The League is always ready to correspond with Swedish Societies and Churches as 
well as individuals to foster unity and love as well for old dear Sweden as for our always 
beloved Country "OUR UNITED STATES." 




OCEAN BEACH 



FREE 

DO YOU KNOW THAT EVERY PARENT OWES THEIR CHIL- 
DREN A MUSICAL EDUCATION? THIS CAN BE HAD 
WITHOUT ANY EXPENSE TO YOU 

To everyone who purchases a piano in our store within the next ten 
days we will give absolutely free two terms of music lessons, vocal or instru- 
mental, given personally by a graduate professor. 

New Pianos, $148, $165, Etc. Thirty days 
Free Trial — $1.50 per week 

THE ZELLNER PIANO CO. 



808 South Broadway Opposite Hamburger's 



Scandi: 



-A 



canainavian- American Line 



Li: 



Royal Scandinavian and U. S. Mail Service 




Large, fast, modern constructed twin-screw passenger steamers: 

"Oscar II," "Hellig Olav," "United States," "Frederik VIII" 

All these steamers are expressly built for the Scandinavian- American line and "Frederik VIII" is 
the largest and finest steamer ever built for the passenger traffic between Scandinavia and New York. 

EXCELLENT PASSENGER ACCOMMODATIONS— UNSURPASSED CUISINE 
ALL RECORDS BROKEN 

"Frederik VIII," which arrived in New York. May 23, with 1138 passengers, sailed again with 1056 
passengers, making a total for the round trip of 

2196 PASSENGERS 

This is the largest number of passengers ever carried by any steamer on a round trip between 
New York and Scandinavia. 



HALVOR JACOBSEN & CO. 



No Contraband or Ammunition Supplies Carried 

SCANDINAVIAN-AMERICAN LINE 



1 Broadway, New York; 250 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




ii it \i j m t 
A LEMON GROVE 



3Gna Angela Qlnunty 

^W ^ ITHIN the limits of Los Angeles County may be found a great variety 
■ of scenery and climate. Within its 4000 square miles of territory 
Xh **^ may be found the climate and scenery of almost every part of the 
State, from the cool and breezy seashore, to the warm island plains and brac- 
ing mountain tops. The present population is estimated at 815,000. The 
assessed valuation of property last year, after equalization, including railroads, 
was $849,991,595. The Swedish population is estimated at 15,000 in round 
figures. 







HULBURD RANCH, NEAR DESCANSO 



Phones: Home 1005, Main 7519 
Hours: 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. 



E.E.Churchill,o P t.D. 

EYE SIGHT SPECIALIST 

Eyes Examined and Fitted by Latent 
Scientific Methods 




Teeth 

Extracted 

FREE 



407-8 Broadway Central Building 
424 South Broadway 

LOS ANGELES 



THIS DOES NOT OBLIGATE YOU FOR OTHER WORK 

I am making this offer to acquaint you with 
my advanced painless dental methods. My 
prices are exceptionally moderate and all my 
work is guaranteed for twelve years. 

Set of Teeth, best red rubber $5.00 

Gold Crowns $4.00 

Bridge Work, best $4.00 

Porcelain Crowns $4.00 

Gold and Porcelain Fillings $1.00 up 

Silver, Amalgam and Cement Fillings .... 50c up 
Plates repaired, good as new 50c up 

SPECIAL OFFER 

ALUMINUM PLATES - - $18.00 each 

The Cleanest, Lightest and Most Satisfactory Plates 
Made— Absolute Fit and Satisfaction Guaranteed 

DR. FRANK C. CAMPBELL 



office hours: 

B-6 
SUNDAYS »-12 



PAINLESS DENTIST 
437 S. BROADWAY 

Over Brock & Co. Jewelere 



phones: 

HOME F 7237 
MAIN 6298 



BRING THIS CARD WITH J0U AND WE WILL GIVE YOU CREDIT 
FOR $1.00 ON WORK AMOUNTING TO $10.00 



MJUtU'.JLJUUUUe '..■' J .".."„»,.»-."„" J .'f.J' J J'. 1 ". l ". t ". l ".."..". l "„",.",^„"„",.",0'..",."„v„»- 

G. ECKDAHL 

REAL ESTATE, FIRE INSURANCE 
FIRST MORTGAGE LOANS 

424 Marsh-Strong Building 

SWEDISH VICE CONSULATE 

424 Marsh-Strong Building 

Wills Drawn 

Estates settled both in United States and Sweden 

Competent attorney connected with the Consulate 



Would You Refuse an Introduc- 
tion or a Recommendation 
to a Possible Buyer or 
Seller? 

An advertisement in the Swedish -Amer- 
ican Trade Journal is just such an intro- 
duction. 

A membership in the Swedish Chamber 
of Commerce of the United States is just 
such a recommendation. 

You are placed in instant touch with the 
members of the Chambers in United States, 
Sweden and other countries, and with hun- 
dreds of first-class business people the 
world over. 

A year ago the advertising in the 
Trade Journal was confined to two pages 
of a sixteen page "Bulletin." Now there 
are already twelve pages of a twenty-four 
page Trade Journal. 

September 1, 1914, there were 281 
members of the Chamber, now about 500. 

There must be a reason! 

It pays! 

For rates, address 

Mr. H. B. Heiden, 1407 Fifth Ave., Seattle, 

Wash., member of the Board of 

Directors of the 

Swedish Chamber of Commerce 

OF THE U. S. A. 

Produce Exchange Annex, New York, N.Y. 



Phone A 9155 



Sundays, to 1 2 noon. 




J 



% 



BRILL'S DRESS SUITS 

319 South Spring Street 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



Dress Suits for rent - $1.00 and up 

Dress Suits sold at $12.50 and up 

$5.00 down and balance weekly 

MISS CHAMBERLAIN MRS. WILLIAMS 

Main 5848 F 2954 

VANITY FAIR TEA ROOM 

LUNCHEON AND AFTERNOON TEA 

11:30 A. M. Until 5:30 P. M. 

Private Room for Luncheons, Bridge or Tea 
Parties 

218 WEST NINTH STREET 

Between Broadway and Hill 

LOS ANGELES 



atfO=^*0*83«3^a^^ 



LOUIS HIPPE 



HARRY KARPELS 



PHONE MAIN 4836 
HIPPE AND KARPEL'S 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

AND 

MASSAGE 

ELECTRIC CABINET BATHS 
NEEDLE SHOWER BATHS 

If you are troubled with Poor Circulation, Rheumatism, Indigestion, 
Lumbago, Nervous Debility, Obesity, Neuritis, Colds, 
Grippe or Thinness, call at our Office 

202 BROCKMAN BUILDING 
7th Street and Grand Avenue Los Angeles, Calif. 

OFFICE HOURS, 9 A. M. TO 9 P. M. 

WEIGHT REDUCED OR INCREASED 



GERMAN-AMERICAN 
TRUST and SAVINGS BANK 

Spring, at Seventh Street, Los Angeles 
SAVINGS — COMMERCIAL — TRUST 



Our depositors enjoy the most modern and complete facilities of depart- 
mental banking service. Every transaction receives individual, personal at- 
tention, and is handled with the greatest possible accuracy and despatch. 
Interest-bearing savings accounts opened for all amounts from $1.00 upward. 



% 

SWEDISH IRON & STEEL | 

CORPORATION | Compliments of 

The largest and most important dis- y HAKLUW o UArll. 

tributors of Swedish Iron and L(JS AngeleS) Cal 

Steel Products of the Amer- p 
ican Continent 



I 



xo ■ ■ 






li=i! I Visit the 

§ CAWSTON OSTRICH FARM 

o At South Pasadena 

g 

OFFICES AND WAREHOUSES See the Baby Chicks 

General Office: 12 Piatt St., New York City # 

PuT k J y i\- S enV ^ , I ° nl y down-town store, 723 

Philadelphia New Orleans 

Cleveland San Francisco South Broadway 

Chicago Montreal, Canada O 

Stockholm, Sweden g CAWSTON OSTRICH FARM 



Sty? ^weuiah-Attwnratt flainotir ifoague 

nf California, SttrorporatriJ 

The central organization of this league, now more than twenty years old, was organ- 
ized by the committee in charge of the Swedish branch of the San Francisco Midwinter 
Exposition in 1 894. This was its first participation in a general undertaking in Californai. 
All who assisted in this undertaking know how very difficult it had been up to this time 
to create an interest among Swedish people for any general undertaking. The success 
at this time gave an impetus to further efforts, and quite a few of those taking an interest 
at that time are still in the harness, actively interesed in the Swedish Exposition Com- 
mittee, the Patriotic League, or in some of the other older organizations. 

The history of this league as a central organization goes back to January 28, 1895. 
According to its constitution, it purposes to be an independent organization with liberal 
tendencies and made up of delegates from the various local leagues within the state. All 
persons who have served as ex-presidents and continue as active members of some local 
league remain a part of this organization. All delegates are elected by the league at this 
regular July meeting, and serve for the period of one year. 

The purpose of the league is to work in the interest of the Swedish people in Cal- 
ifornia; to encourage a proper bond of union; to make possible concerted efforts in matters 
of general interest to our countrymen; to arrange an annual midsummer festival to be 
held on the Saturday nearest to midsummer day, and to give financial aid for the erection 
of a Swedish club building. 

The league has, during its more than twenty-year existence, given splendid evidences 
of Swedish patriotism and aggressiveness and has, without exception, been successful in 
every undertaking. Its first great success dates back to the "Swedish Day" at the Mid- 
winter Exposition of 1894. This was the greatest and most successful gatherinp of Swedish 
people west of Chicago up to this time. This festival was held in San Francisco on May 
14th of that year. Mr. M. H. de Young, the General Director of this exposition and the 
publisher of the "Chronicle" said that the Swedish parade at this time had succeeded in 
making the best appearance. Midsummer festivals have been held since that time and 
have been very successful. Not even during the year of the earthquake, 1906, when com- 
munications were crippled and almost everything else was in confusion, was there an 
exception. 

On the initiative of the league, the Swedish Building Committee was organized June 
9, I 898, for the purpose of raising funds for the already mentioned Swedish Club building, 
and held a bazaar in 1903, the purpose of which was to gather money for this building 
fund. In 1900, the league participated in the proper celebrations of the fiftieth anniver- 
sary commemorating the admission of the State of California into the union. On several 
occasions the league has received in a worthy manner representative persons visiting the 
west coast. 

The most important work of the Patriotic League so far, was in connection with the 
Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco, when through the efforts of 
the league a general participation of the Swedish-Americans was culminaetd in the "Swed- 
ish Day," June 24, 1915. This proved to be the greatest festivity that has ever been held 
among our countrymen in the State of California. 

The league sincerely hopes that the "Swedish Day" this year at San Diego will be 
equally successful, and herewith extends congratulations to our countrymen in Southern 
California, and to all who have taken the initiative in pringing apout the celebration of 
such a day. 

The present officers of the league are as follows: 
C. T. Peterson, President. 
Adrian Peterson, 1st Vice-President. 
Bernhard Anderson, 2nd Vice-President. 
Alex. Olsson, Secretary. 
Chas. J. H. Berg, Treasurer. 
Dr. O. A. Lindstrom. 
Gottfrid T. Petterson. 
Alf. Turnross, Trustees. 
Harry Mentzer. 
K. F, Strandberg. 
Mrs. Fred Johnson. 
Captain Chas. Swanson. 



The Best Place to Eat 



GODFREY'S CAFETERIA 

722 SOUTH BROADWAY* 

Just South of Lankershim Hotel 

THE SHOW PLACE OF LOS ANGELES 

The Finest Cafeteria in the World "Better Cooking than Mother Did" 

Eat Svenskt Spisbrod at 

COLBY CAFETERIA 

441-43-45 SOUTH HILL STREET 
One Block West of Fifth and Broadway 

Delicious Food Large and Airy Dining Room Excellent Service 

MUSIC REST ROOMS BOTH PHONES 

###&#& ooo^o^oooco^ooo^^q^O^O^O^O^Ov •: CHI o 

CARS FOR SPECIAL TRIPS ANY TIME ?? 

20th Century Auto Lines § Hotel Westminster 

Seven-Passenger Cars Between g R. W. LARRITT, Manager 

LOS ANGELES and SAN DIEGO | 250 Rooms European Plan 

9 A. M., I P. M. and 4 P. M. g _ A n 1 r A11 ^ 

» ,~, .. V r ree Auto bus to and from All Trains 

OXNARD, VENTURA and SANTA f 

BARBARA, 3 cars each way daily & RATES: 

V Without bath: $1.00 single, $1.50 double 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: 35 w.tu p, „^ r -u *i tn 1 tocn 

.„. „ . , r .1 1 M . c . w With rnvate bath: $1.50 single, $2.50 

Westminster Hotel, Fourth and Main Sts. A d ' 1 

Broadway 2677 Home 10888 § 

SAN DIEGO OFFICE: '$ Corner Main and Fourth Streets 

Main 836 1053 Third Street & Los Angeles, U. S. A. 

HOTEL VICTORIA 1 



C. H. SAYERS 



Shay's Cafeteria 



WHERE THE FOOD ALWAYS 



RATES: $1.00 and up per day. Special O 

Weekly Rates g 

In the center of the new shopping district. ^ 

Opposite Robi„.on'. New Store | HAg .^ ^^ FLAVQR 

One Hundred Rooms with or with- & 

out Bath § 

n i ,,a* ■ -.no, * 648-50 South Hill St., Los Angeles 

Phones: Broadway 7400, Home F 4083 g 

Corner Seventh and Hope Streets § 341 South Main St., Salt Lake City 

LOS ANGELES 1 



ifw 



of £>omi> of (§m !I*U Knnron Jfropl? 




ALMER <Jw*l*. 

Was born in Sweden in 1872. He 
came to the United States in 1 892 
and located in St. Paul, Minn., liv- 
ing there for a period of six years. 
In 1900 Mr. Aimer came to San 
Diego, Calif., where he remained for 
two years, locating at the end of 
that time in Los Angeles. For the 
past fourteen years he has been with 
the Mullen & Bluett Clothing Com- 
pany of this city. Mr. Aimer is a 
member of the Swedish Tabernacle, 
having been a trustee of this church 
for the last seven years. 

ALBERT ALMSTEDT, Cement 
Contractor 

Came to United States in 1901 
and has lived in Los Angeles most 
of the time. One of the organizers 
and charter members of North Star 
Lodge of V. O. Served as their 
first secretary. He has been a very 
active worker in this society. Del- 
egate to the Grand Lodge Conven- 
toin at Minneapolis, Minn., 1915. 

A. G. ANDERSON, Manager, West- 
ern Pacific Mining Co. 

Mr. Anderson was born in Werm- 
land, Sweden, January 25th, 1871. 
He came to Los Angeles in March, 
1902, and since that time has been 
actively engaged in mining. In 1 908 
he became manager of the Western 
Pacific Mining Company, which po- 
sition he now holds. 

ADOLPH H. ANDERSON 

Born in Alfsborg Province, Wes- 
tergotland, 1882. Came to the 
United States in 1902. Completed 
a course in a business college shortly 
after. Has been engaged in busi- 
ness for himself for a number of 
years in Los Angeles. He is at 
present excursion agent of San 
Diego Electric Ry. Co., at San Diego. 



GUSTAVE E. F. ANDERSON, M.D. 

Born in Sweden 1 863, came to 
San Francisco, Cal., 1887, and set- 
tled later in Los Angeles. He is a 
Freemason and a member of North 
Star V. O., has many friends and is a 
very popular after-dinner speaker. 

R. O. BELLAND, Capitalist, Banker 
and Businessman 

Was born in Norway in 1867. He 
is a graduate from High School. He 
came to the United States about 
twenty-five years ago and located in 
Chicago, 111., where he became man- 
ager of a department store. He has 
also been a district manager for the 
Northwestren Mutual Life Insurance 
Company. He organized the Scan- 
dinavian-American Bank of Fargo, 
N. D., where he became cashier and 
director. Mr. Belland came to Los 
Angeles about five years ago. He 
was one of the organizers of the 
Continental National Bank and held 
a position as manager of the Scan- 
dinavian Department, which posi- 
tion he had to give up after one 
year's service on account of his 
health. He is the owner of the Grif- 
fith Park Apartments, one of the 
finest apartment houses in Holly- 
wood. 

J. F. BACKSTRAND, Merchant 

Riverside, Cal. Born in Halland, 
Sweden, July 21, 1858. Came to 
Jamestown, N. Y., together with his 
parents 1872, but moved to Chand- 
lers Valley the same year. He start- 
ed as boy in a clothing store and 
has ever since followed the mercan- 
tile business. Was engaged in the 
shoe business in Princeton, Ills., for 
a number of years. Came to Los 
Angeles, 1896 and moved to River- 
side, Cal., 1900, where he owns one 
of the largest department stores. It 
can be truly said about Mr. Back- 
strand that he has always been a pat- 
riotic Swede at heart. 



A 6529 Furnished Rooms § DAHLIA APARTMENTS 

i'f 2611 Logan Ave. San Diego, Cal. 



"A Meal without Meat" 



VEGETARIAN 
CAFETERIA 

257-59 South Hill Street 

A HAPPY SMILE 

Comes easier with Good 

Digestion 



$ 

-::- 



I 



New and elegantly furnished two and 
three-room apartments. Private baths, 
hot and cold water. 

RATES: 

Two room apartment, $ 1 month and up 
Per day, $1.00 and up 

Three room apartments, $25 month and up 
Per day, $2.00 and up 

A. G. DAHL THEO. HEDLUND, 

Proprietor Manager 



O Home 20903 



Broadway 2707 



s 

1 

1 

I 
| 

§1 

9 
1 

s 



Naturopathic Institute and 
Sanitarium 

of California, Inc. 

DR. CARL SCHULTZ, President and Gen. Mgr. 
Rational Systems of Healing: Massage, Os- 
teopathy, Chiropractic, Hydrotherapy; including 
Electric Light, Nauheim and other Medicated 
Baths, Electro-Therapy, Proper Diet, and all 
other Scientific Methods. 

Free Lecture Every Thursday 8 p. m. 

DR. MARGARET GOETTLER, Supt. 

1319 South Grand Avenue Los Angeles, Calif. 





John A. Cederlind 

CEDERL1ND-PERSON CO. 

Successors to United Phosphaet Co., Inc. 

DEALERS IN TALLOW AND HIDES 



Pete B. Person 
Home 29164 



Phone Home 29850 



Office: 1S61 East 47th Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



DR. F. E. BERGE 

Born in Sweden in 1870. Came 
to the United States as a child. He 
graduated from the University at 
Ann Arbor, Michigan, after which 
he located in Grand Rapids, where 
he practiced as a physician and sur- 
geon until he came to Los Angeles. 
Dr. Berge's reputation in Grand 
Rapids, as one of the leading sur- 
geons in that community, has fol- 
lowed him here. Since coming to 
Los Angeles he has interested him- 
self to a great extent in the Swedish 
Colony, and you will find him always 
ready and willing to give his services 
to anything that is for the good of 
his fellow-countrymen. 

H. H. BERGGREN 

Was born in Sweden 1858 and 
came to United States in 1883. He 
has traveled very much and came to 
Lindsborg, Kansas, in 1888. He 
came to Los Angeles five years ago 
and was the proprietor of "Home 
Dairy Lunch" until May, 1916, 
when he sold his place of business 
and is now retired. He is vice- 
president for the Singing Society 
Harmony and a member of Nord- 
stjernan, V. O. 

HERMAN BOSTROM 

Was born in Sweden, April 8th, 
1 888, where he graduated from 
High School. He came to 

Stockholm shortly after he had fin- 
ished his education and took a 
position with the O. A. Lilgegren 
Book Store. After a short time he 
was offered a position as head clerk 
in the paper department of West- 
ling's Book & Stationery Co., which 
position he held until the firm dis- 
continued business. In 1907 Mr. 
Bostrom started his own wholesale 
paper business and continued for 
three years, when he sold out to a 
stock company of which he became 
president. 

He left Sweden in 1911 for Eng- 
land but shortly thereafter he de- 
cided to come to the United States. 
He first located in New York City, 
where he held a position as sales- 
man and also manager of a life in- 
surance company. He came to Los 
Angeles only last year. During the 



short time he has resided in Los An- 
geles, he has been very active in 
the Swedish Colony, especially 
among the Vasa Order of America. 
He is at present Resident of the 
Local Lodge North Star. It can be 
rightly said of Mr. Bostrom that he is 
a good booster. He has done a great 
deal to work up the interest for the 
Vasa Order, also for the Swedish 
Day on which Committee he is serv- 
ing as Secretary. He is a festival 
speaker and a good Writer and con- 
tributes often to the columns of the 
local Swedish paper and others. He 
is chairman of the Finance Commit- 
tee of the Singing Society Harmonie, 
and a member of the Swedish-Amer- 
ican National League. 

HENRY CARLSON 

Was born in Sweden in 18 72. 
Came to British Columbia, Canada, 
in 1891, and to San Francisco in 
1893. Moved to Los Angeles in 
1 894. He was with the Palace Ho- 
tel about two years, 189 7-98, and 
has been in his present business for 
1 8 years. Mr. Carlson is a Swede 
by heart and is always ready to do 
more than his share for anything 
good for our common interests. 

J. M. CARLSON 

Born in Sweden, Christmas Eve, 
185 7. Came to America together 
with his parents when only a boy of 
eleven, or in 1869. His parents lo- 
cated in Sycamore, Ills., where they 
bought a small farm. His early 
training on the farm in Illinois, to- 
gether with his keen foresight soon 
placed him on his own farm. He 
moved to Newmangrove, Neb., in 
1887 where he bought a large farm 
which he soon made one of the show 
places in that community. Owing to 
his health he was forced to retire 
from a farmer's life while yet in mid- 
dle age, and he moved to California 
in 1908. Was married to Helen Ol- 
son of De Kalb, Ills., in 1894, and 
has four children, three boys and one 
girl. Mr. Carlson is always willing 
and ready to promote the interests 
of our Swedish Colony here. He is 
a member of the Swedish Lutheran 
Church, where he has served as 
Treasurer and Trustee for several 
years. 




IT MIGHT BE 



BUT IT IS NOT 



HENRY CARLSON 
Member of Executive Committee 



WELL 



to leave your Laundry any place or to 
anybody 



Carlson Laundry 

Will Satisfy Y< 



ou 



1 appeal to YOU brother for your sake and also for mine to leave 
all your laundry in any one of our offices in the heart of the city. Your 
little laundry girl, mostly Scandivanians, is right there at your service. 



CARLSON LAUNDRY 



Phone A 1 789 



Main Office 708-10 W. 3rd St. 



CARLSON LAUNDRY BRANCH OFFICES 



103 W. 8th St. 

317 W. 8th St., (across from 

Hamburger's). 
721 W. 8th St., (in Congress 

Hotel). 
306 W. 7th St., (across from 

Bullock's). 
513 W. 7th St., (Twain Hotel). 
805 W. 7th St. 
1218 W. 7th St., (across from 

Balboa Hotel). 
109 N. Main St. 
435 S. Main St., (in Rosslyn 

Hotel). 



1054 S. Main St. 
904 S. Broadway. 
323 E. 9th St. 
325 E. 5th St. 

504 E. 5th St. 

505 E. 3rd St. 
309 W. Pico St. 

1303 W. Washington St. 
412 S. Hill St. (Hotel Clark). 
118 W. 3rd St. 
519 W. 6th St. 
613 W. 6th St. 
710 W. 6th St., (in Acacia 
Hotel). 

708-10 W. 3rd St., (Main Office) 



By B. F. RANDEL 

Sweden has no national 
day, in the same sense as 
other countries have. There 
is no Fourth of July, as in 
the United States, or 1 7th of 
May, as in Norway. These 
national days celebrate a 
time when the nations sev- 
ered their connection with 
some other country and be- 
came independent. But we 
may go back in the history 
to such a remote past that 
we have no further records 
to search and we shall find 
Sweden independent and the 
Swedes in full possession of 
their liberty. There never 
was a day when the Swedes 
had to fight to regain their 
independence. They have 
always been independent. 

This is the reason that 
Sweden has no national day 
in the same sense that other 
countries have. There is, 
however, a day which more 
and more takes the nature of 
3 national day, and this day 
is Midsummer Day, the 24th 

"OSCAR II., Late King of Sweden ° f J Une ' 

A Friend of the Swedish-Americans It IS fitting that this day 

shall be the national day of Sweden. Then it is that the summer is in its 
height. Then it is that the day is the longest, with the Midnight Sun seen in 
northern parts. Then it is that the fields are in their full development, when 
the flowers are in bloom, when the entire nature of that northern country is 
in its grandest glory. 

This national day of Sweden will naturally be a day of different char- 
acter than other national days. It is a celebration of peace more than a cele- 
bration of war. It is a celebration of that grand work that the Swedes have 
performed in the interest of peaceful development, the development of indus- 
tries and art, the lasting work that Swedish culture has done during more than 
a century of peace. 

I said that there is no occasion for an independence day in Sweden, as 
that country has always been a free country. We may well sing that Swedish 
songs which says "Glorious Land, the Cradle of Liberty on Earth," for there 
is no other country that can point back to such a fact. 

And it is with this knowledge that we Swedish Americans feel that we 
are especially fitted to become Americans. There is in this respect on great 
change between the land of our birth and the land of our adoption. We do 
not gain additional freedom here. We had all that before we left our native 
land. It is not for the reason of oppression that we left our fathers* land. We 
left it for the same reason that the grown son and daughter leaves their home, 
to form new homes, and to strike out for new things. And the Swedes still 
have the old Viking spirit, and long to see other countries. It is still in their 





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GEE, BUT THIS HOME COOKING IS SOME FINE 
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Delicious and savory, and oh, the toothsome pastries, preserves, etc. Every- 
thing is spotlessly clean and the service is a notch ahead of most cafeterias. 
Prices reasonable. 

Y. M. C. A. CAFETERIA 

721 SOUTH HOPE STREET, LOS ANGELES 

Tom Murray, Manager Good Parking for Autos 

GREEN'S • 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ART STORE 

Thousands of Pictures, Frames and Mouldings to choose from 
Prices Reasonable 

Telephone Orders have our prompt attention 

815 South Hill Street 

Phones: F 4004, Main 7395 



blood to be pioneers, and to gain new victories and to conquer as their 
fathers did centuries ago. In America they feel at home because they have the 
same liberty as they had before, and they have the same opportunity to further 
developments under this same liberty. 

You will also find this as a reason for the more speedy assimilation into 
the American nation of the naturalized Swedish Americans, than any other 

naturalized citizens. There are no more 
loyal citizens than the Swedish Ameri- 
cans. They may be considered nothing 
but complete Americans, with no other 
thoughts or desires than the welfare of 
their adopted land. 

That they now and then will turn 
their thoughts back to the "old country," 
where they perhaps have an old father or 
mother sitting alone, dreaming of their 
son or daughter far away across land and 
sea, no one can wonder. If we would not 
turn our thoughts back to our former 
home, and if we would not honor the 
land of our birth and cherish the past 
memories, then we would not be worthy 
to be called Americans. And we know 
that no real, loyal and patriotic Ameri- 
can wants us to do otherwise. 

We are here to stay. Few of us 
would want to go back for any other 
reason than to pay a short visit. Our 
work is for America first and last. We 
are born under liberty. We have always 
fought for liberty and we cannot help but 
sometimes ask, "What would America 
have been without that fight for freedom 
of thought that our Grand King Gustavus 
Adolphus waged in the 30 year war. 
Would it have been what it is without the 
victories of the Swedes in that war?" 

And we intend to fight for liberty, 
for the retaining of American liberty 
against foes, be they from without or 
from within. "For liberty and America." 
That is our motto. 





BY RAIL TO MOUNT LOWE 
Scene Near Los Angeles 



Overlooking Central Park 



i'f Home 60327 



Broadway 673 7 






& 



JEAN HOTEL 



EUROPEAN PLAN 

Auditorium Hotel 

B. F. AND M. S. GREEN, Proprietors 
Convenient, yet quiet. Especially de- * Rooms with or without bath, single or 
sirable for ladies traveling alone. ,;;, ensuite. 100 all outside rooms 

150 Outside Rooms 75 Baths g 

Rates, $1.00 per day and up 

Fifth and Olive Sts., Los Angeles, Calif. O 1 40 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

SELIG ZOO 



NORTH MAIN 

AND 
MISSION ROAD 
LOS ANGELES 

CAL. 



Telephone 
East 33 




THE 

MILLION 

DOLLAR 

SHOW PLACE 



THE LARGEST PRIVATELY OWNED 

COLLECTION OF JUNGLE 

ANIMALS AND BIRDS 

IN THE WORD 

AND 

THE JUNGLE LAND 
OF AMERICA 

Take North Main or North Broadway Cars 

Ten Minutes from the Center 
of Los Angeles 



ANDREW CHILBERG 

Vice Consul of Sweden, and 
Banker at Seattle, Wash., was born 
in Sweden March 29, 1845. Came 
to the United States, together with 
his parents the following year and 
settled in Ottumwa, Iowa, where he 
received his early education. At the 
age of fifteen he accompanied his 
father to Colorado, prospecting. Four 
years later he crossed the plains 
from Omaha to Sacramento; he re- 
turned, however, after several years, 
to Iowa. He finally moved to the 
Coast in 1874. Mr. Chilberg has 
held many positions of honor and 
importance. He was one of the or- 
ganizers of the Scandinavian-Ameri- 
can Bank at Seattle for which he 
served as President for many years. 
He was appointed as Vice Consul by 
the Swedish Government in 1879, 
and has been decorated with the 
Royal Order of Vasa. 

ALBIN ENGELBRECHT 

A Civil Engineer, a graduate 
from the Technical University of 
Stockholm. He is a member of the 
Swedish-American National League, 
the Singing Society Harmony, North 
Star Lodge, and the Free Masons. 
He is also a member of the Publicity 
Committee of the "Swedish Day** 
Celebration. 

OSCAR FLENSBURG 

Born in Ronneby, Blekinge, came 
to United States in 1904, remained 
in Worchester, Mass., three years 
and arrived in Los Angeles in 1907. 
Mr. Flensburg is the owner of a first 
class Merchant Tailoring establish- 
ment in the Henne Bldg., 1 22 West 
3rd Street, and his success is due to 
his spfendid work as well as on ac- 
count of his pleasant personality. 
He is very popular among his many 
friends and is a member of Deott, 

V. o. 

ALFRED HAIJ 

Editor and publisher of the Cali- 
fornia Veckoblad, a Swedish news- 
paper published in Los Angeles. Mr. 
Haij was born in Dalsland in 1872. 



He came to the United States in 
1890 and located in Chicago. While 
in Chicago he learned the printing 
trade and later had charge of the 
printing department at North Park 
College. In 1905 he moved to Win- 
nipeg, Canada, where he was a fore- 
man on the Canada Post, a Swedish 
newspaper. He came to Los Angeles 
in 1907 where he has resided ever 
since. 

Through his paper Mr. Haij has 
always been ready to endorse any- 
thing for the good of the Swedish 
Colony, and he has been a strong 
supporter of the Swedish Day. 

JOHN E. HAMMAR 

Born in Sweden in 1 868. Came 
to Philadelphia, Pa., the 10th of 
April, 1890, and to Los Angeles in 
1903. Has had many offices, and 
worked very hard for the Order of 
Vasa. He has been the first Presi- 
dent of the North Star Lodge. He is 
now Secretary for a Financial Com- 
mittee of the "Swedish Day** Cele- 
bration, and has been doing a great 
deal of good work for same commit- 
tee. 

REV. V. E. HEDBERG 

Was born in Rush City, Minn., 
May 20th, 1873. He graduated 
from the Swedish Theological Semi- 
nary, connected with the University 
of Chicago and was ordained as pas- 
tor September 4th, 1897. After his 
ordination, his first pastorate was 
with the Swedish Baptist Church of 
Berwin, Illinois. Came to Los An- 
geles in the fall of 1913 and took 
charge of the Swedish Baptist 
Church. 

HERMAN HILBURG, Pianist, Or- 
ganist and Choral Director 

Certified Instructor of "Rector 
System" at Von Stein Academy, 
1924 South Figueroa Street, Los 
Angeles, Calif. Mr. Hilberg has 
been connected with the Von Stein 
Academy for the past eight years 
and at present is Assistant Superin- 
tendent of the Piano Department. 
He is also leader of the Big Chorus, 
specially made up for these festivals. 



ST. CHARLES HOTEL 

C. & J. DONOHO, Proprietors 

Location in the heart of the city. 
Six hundred feet from Broadway 
and Fifth Streets. 

Modern concrete building of 1 00 
rooms; all outside light, airy, steam 
heat. 

Cafeterias, Restaurants, Tea-Rooms, 
Etc., within Two Blocks of Hotel 

Homelike — Comfortable 

RATES - 75 cents to $1.00 

Privilege of Bath 

Rooms with Private Bath, $1.50 
per Day and Up 

Special Rates by Week or Month 
Parties made especially welcome 

Bus meets all Trains and Steamers 
1229 Eighth Street 

Telephone Main 4065 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. <J 


ttCttOttO 0#0#O#0 



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HOTEL 

BELMONT 

W. D. CRAIGO, Proprietor 

SPECIAL RATES! 

Two Persons per Room: 

Privilege of Bath, 1.25 to 1.50 
Private Bath 2.00 

Suites for Four People - 3.50 

Opposite U. S. Grant Hotel 

TAKE OUR FREE BUS 
Or Any Car from Depot 

926 Third Street, near Broadway 
Overlooking the Plaza 

San Diego, California 



SMOK-UM 

WESTLAND'S CIGARS 

Silver State Havana 

10c, 15c, 2 for 25c 



I 

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JOHN A. WOLINE CARL E. JOHNSON 

Member of Member of 

V. O. and V. O. and 

the L. O. O. M. Scandinavian Society 



Woline & Johnson 

SWEDISH CIGAR DEALERS 

And Agents for Swedish Newspapers 



FRED EICKMEYER 

5 I 5 F STREET 

SAN DIEGO CALIFORNIA 

Foreign and Domestic Delicacies 

Cheese, Smoked and Salted Fish, 

Smoked Meats and Sausages 

Canned Delicacies 








! 





o 



For information about 
San Diego, see us 



Corner of 5th and G Sts., across the street 
from City Hall 



CAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 



REV. T. S. JOHNSTON, A.B., B.D. REV. F. O. KLING 



Was born in Flintstone, Mel. 
Moved from there to Portland, 
Conn., and together with his par- 
ents made a somewhat prolonged 
visit to Sweden. On the way to 
Sweden he traveled through parts 
of France and Germany, and return- 
ing from Sweden he came by the 
way of England. While in Sweden 
he had the privilege of attending a 
public school and high school. He 
came back to this country and took 
up his residence in Paw Paw, West 
Va., where he and his folks were the 
only Swedes. From there he moved 
to Penneld, Pa., after a short stay 
at Du Bois, Pa. In 1891 he moved, 
together with his folks, to Titusville, 
Pa. f where he remained until the 
Fall of 1894, when he took up his 
studies at Augastana College and 
Theological Seminary at Rock Is- 
land, Ills., and there completed the 
college course and received the de- 
gree of A. B. in 1900. In the Fall 
of the same year he entered the 
Theological Department at the same 
place and finished this course in 
1903, receiving the B. D. degree, 
and was ordained as a minister of 
the Swedish Evangelical Lutheran 
Augastana Synod at its annual meet- 
ing held at Paxton, Ills., whereupon 
he assumed the duties as a pastor of 
the Ebenezer Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, Chicago, Ills. A year prev- 
ious to his ordination he had been in 
charge of this little Mission in Chi- 
cago, and continued as a pastor of 
this church until September 1, 1915, 
when he came to Los Angeles, and 
here assumed charge of the Ange- 
lica Swedish Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, During his pastorite in Chi- 
cago he served on various Boards 
and Committees, and at the time of 
his removal from there he was a 
member of the Headquarters Com- 
mittee of the Anti-Saloon League of 
the State of Illinois. He was mar- 
ried in 1905 to Victoria Johnson, a 
graduate from the Valparaiso Uni- 
versity, Valparaiso, Ind., and they 
are the parents of two children, a 
boy, Theodore, and a girl, Helen. 



Was born in Vester Norrlands 
Lan, Jamtland, where he finished 
the public schools and afterwards 
finished his High School work in a 
private school. He emigrated to the 
United States in 1893, locating in 
North Michigan, where he was em- 
ployed for a while as lumber inspec- 
tor at one of the large saw mills. 
During this time he took up his 
studies through a correspondence 
school and in the fall of 1898 he 
became a student of the Theolog- 
ical Seminary of North Park Col- 
lege, Chicago. He graduated in 
1902 from this college and was or- 
dained in 1903 in Minneapolis. Since 
his ordination he has served the fol- 
lowing congregations: Norway, 
Mich; Wyonett, Minn.; Duluth, 
Minn., and the Salems Church of 
Minneapolis. 

He came to Los Angeles in Oc- 
tober, 191 1 , as pastor of the Taber- 
nacle Church. He married Miss Ida 
M. Nelson, March, 1907, having four 
children — three boys and one girl. 

Rev. Kling is considered one of 
the best Swedish speakers on the 
Pacific Coast, and during his resi- 
dence in Los Angeles has made a 
great many friends not only within 
his own church, but elsewhere. 

CHAS. A. KUNOU 

Born in Stockholm in 1865. Re- 
ceived his education in Sweden. 
Came to the United States in 1 888, 
and located in Boston, Mass., where 
he became an assistant teacher in 
Sloyd, and in 1 889 he was superin- 
tendent of the Department of Sloyd 
in New Britian and Willimantic, 
Conn., for five years. Came to Los 
Angeles in 1894, where he has been 
employed as Superintendent of 
Manual Training in the City Gram- 
mar Schools. Mr. Kunou has done 
much during his service in the school 
departments of this city to promote 
and introduce the Swedish system 
of manual training. He was the 
President of the Swedish-American 
National League during 1915. He 
is a very effective speaker in the 
Swedish language. 



3. W. ftobiusmt OIo. 

Hj ABI fciJ»g?^JX a ffll ■ * '>\yr^ r i1l Seventh and Grand 

Los Angeles, California 



THE METHODIST 
HOSPITAL 

of Southern California 

"A genuinely Christian and 
thoroughly equipped hospital" 

Thoroughly Modern 

and Fireproof 

2826 SO. HOPE ST. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Reasonable Rates 



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Los Angeles Trust and Savings Bank 

N, W. Cor. Sixth and Spring Sts. 
Los Angeles, California 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $3,075,000.00 

Interest Paid on Deposits 



ell Known Business and Professional Men 




J.A. Nelson , A. H. Anderson 

Venfist - An£e7e$ Cal. Schoolteacher- Los Angr/fs. 5dn Di<?£&, Cal . 





HERMAN BOSTROM 

President 

Nordstjerne, Lodge No. 103 V. O. 



GUSTAV HJORT 

Secretary 



NORDSTJERNAN, LODGE NO. 106, VASA ORDER OF AMERICA 

This lodge is the largest and most successful society in the city of Los Angeles. It pays on the 
average about 1,000 dollars a year to members sick or in need of help. 

The Monthly Dues are 50 cents. We invite our good people to join in the work for the common 
interests. 

We meet every Tuesday night at 8:15 p. m. in Flower Auditorium, 18th and Flower Streets, Los 
Angeles, Cal, 



UNITED 
STAGES 

Depot 

733 South Spring Street 

Telephone Main Home A 2404 

Branch Office Baltimore Hotel 



Sightseeing; Autos for Hire 



San Diego Office, 1059 Third Street 

Pennants, Banners, Flags, Badges and Celluloid Buttons 



PACIFIC 



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PENNANT 



A NOVELTY CO ^6 jT 



Catalina Island 

AND RETURN 
Daily Trips 9 a. m. Special Rate 

$2.50 

To Delegates Only- 
White Star Line Santa Catalina 
Island Tours 

Personally Conducted 

Including the famous Glass Bottom 
Boats and Marine Gardens, FREE 

Enjoy a delightful trip on the only Twin 

Screw High Speed Boats across 

the Channel 

Main Ticket Office, 525 South Spring 
Street 

Main 729; Home F 7117 

Make reservations a day ahead 

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If it's Service you want 
we have it 



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Manufacturers, Jobbers and Importers of 

NOVELTIES OF ALL KINDS 

FELT AND ART LEATHER SOUVENIRS ! 

Everything for Advertising. Celebrations, Conven- Q 
tions, Carnivals, Festivals, Picnics, Excursions, Etc. 

Samples and prices furnished free. Get our prices. 
We Save You Money. j£ 

PACIFIC PENNANT and NOVELTY CO. § 

244-246 New High Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Phones: F 3 ! 52, Main 5923 X 

fi^0^0#t^0#&#0#0s;^0^=o^i=0>x=0>X ! :0';;=Q=;;=:Q^ 

Anderson's Home Bakery i 

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SWEDISH and AMERICAN 

BREAD § 

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Phones: Wilshire 1599, Home 53154 
WAGON WILL CALL 
1432 West 1 0th St. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 8 



CAKES BAKED TO ORDER 
All Kinds of 



Home Phone 1 526 

Sunset Main 526 

SNYDER'S 

I X L LAUNDRY 



Works: 10th and I Streets 
San Diego, Cal. 



We have neutral suds 
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/ell Known Business and Professional People 









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Los Angeles 






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Star 

Engraving 

Co. 



"The House 
of Quality" 



223 East Fourth Street 

Phones 
A 5663 Main 5680 



ADDINGTON MORRISON 

735 South Hope St. 1246 South Hope § 

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WOODWARD 

42! W. 8th St. 

THREE HOTELS 

Under One Management 
Rates: 75c to $1.50 

First Class Service 



GEO. A. EASTMAN, Proprietor 



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Roehrig Studio 

424 South Broadway 
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Bekin's Van and Storage Co. 
MOVING— PACKING 

STORAGE— SHIPPING 

Reduced Freight Rates and Through 

Car Service on 
Household Goods and Automobiles 

To and from all points 

Affiliations in Principal Cities 

Fireproof Storage: 

1 335 South Figueroa Street 

Non-Fireproof Storage: 

4th and Alameda Streets 

O^OvO^o^o^o^o ■:- o o <:> .> 

EVERYTHING 

IN 

MUSIC 

Pianos 

Player Pianos 
Phonographs 
Brass, Reed 
and Stringed 
Instruments 
Sheet Music, Etc. 
Catalogs on Request 
Fred E. Peteman, Treasurer 



SOUTHERN 
JFORNlAi' 



Frank J. Hart, President 




332-34 SO. BROADWAY, 



LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



DR. ALBERT E. WILSON 

One of America's foremost ed- 
ucators. Born in Omaha, Nebraska, 
of Swedish parentage. Graduated 
from Augustana College, University 
of Chicago, University of Berlin, 
Germany, where after three years' 
studies he took Ph.D. degree. Build- 
er of "Manual Arts High School," 
which stands as a monument to his 
integrity. Gave two courses of lec- 
tures at Columbia University during 
the summer session of 1915. Nov., 
1915, was elected President of the 
National Educational Association of 
Southern Cal. Served as president 
of Swedish-American National 
League during the second year of its 
existence. 



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R. O. BELLAND 
Banker 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



CHKHWHHCHWHWHWHWS^a*^^^ 




E. A. ROUMAINE 

Proprietor Swedish and German 
Employment Bureau 



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Christopher's Ice Cream 

A refreshing food served by 
our modern stores on 551 and 
741 Broadway. 

When strolling along the 
main thoroughfares, visit our 
parlors and our courteous and 
prompt attendants will look 
after your comfort.. Our ice 
cream is good. In quality, we 
are above competition, in price 
we don't try to compete. 



IOIV2 So. Broadway 



Los Angeles O 





We Cater to 
Swedish Patronage 



our clothes 

for men 
and young 

— meet every requirement 
of style, exclusiveness 
and personality. 

$15, $20, $25 to $45 

Second Floor 

Hats, Haberdashery and 
Boys* Clothing 

First Floor 

J)esmotid5 

553-57 South Spring 

Near Sixth 




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We sell good Ice Cream at 90c per gallon, 
when ordering 3 or more gallons 

STAR ICE CREAM CO. 

Phone Main 1 196 
1548 E. 14th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Ice for Sale 



Established 1866 Capital and Assets $18,000,000 

SVEA INSURANCE CO. 

OF GOTHENBURGH, SWEDEN 
Solicits the Valued Patronage of the Swedish People. 



E. O. Hanson 

Resident Agent 

905 So. Main St. 



Chas. Van Valkenburg 

Special Agent 

805 Story BIdg. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Fire Insurance Is the First Essential to Preparedness 



JOHANNES WALTER WILHELM 
HOVING 

Physician, was born in Wiborg, 
Finland, April 17, 1868. Mr. 
Hoving was graduated as a 
magister (Dr.) of Philosophy at the 
University of Helsingfors in 1889. 
The following year he studied anat- 
omy, histology and dentistry at the 
Friedrich Wilhelm University in Ber- 
lin, and in 1 89 1 continued his studies 
at the "Karolinska Medico-Chirur- 
giska Institutet," in Stockholm, re- 
ceiving his M. D. degree in 1 898. 
Dr. Hoving emigrated to the United 
States in 1 903 an< ^ settled in New 
York city, where he has built up a 
large and lucrative practice. He is 
the author and translator of several 
professional and other essays in 
Swedish, German, Finnish and Eng- 
lish. Dr. Hoving is vice-president 
of the Swedish Home for Aged Peo- 
ple and of the United Swedish So- 
cieties of New York, honorary mem- 
ber of the Swedish Gymnastic So- 
ciety of New York, and life member 
of the Swedish Medical Society of 
Stockholm. He is also a knight of 
the Grand Lodge of Freemasons in 
Sweden and has given several very 
interesting lectures in the lodges in 
New York. 

S. J. JACOBSON 

Watchmaker and Jeweler, was 
born in Mariestad, June 23, 1855. 
Came to the United States in 18^1 
and remained in New York for two 
years, after which he moved to Gal- 
veston, Texas. Came to Los An- 
geles in 1897, where he has been 
in business for himself ever since. 
Mr. Jacobson is one of the pioneer 
Swedes of Los Angeles, but it can 
also be said of him that he cherishes 
a love for his native country, and 
always has at heart the interest of 
the Swedish Colony in Los Angeles. 

MR. HUGO JOHANSON 

Was born in Malmo, Sweden, 
August 25, 1882. Here he spent 
his childhood and received his edu- 
cation. After learning the trade of 
glove-cutting, Mr. Johanson left 
Sweden and traveled extensively 
through Europe. He visited Den- 
mark, Germany, France, Switzer- 
land, Austria, Spain, Italy and also 



spent some time in Africa. At all 
these places he worked at his trade 
of glove making and gained a val- 
uable knowledge of this work from 
all points. 

Mr. Johanson came to this country 
in 1907, stopping first at Boston, 
Mass., where he resided for some 
time. Here he married Miss Olivia 
Johanson of Stockholm, Sweden. 

After traveling over a great part 
of the United States, Mr. Johanson 
came to Los Angeles in 1913 and 
opened his present glove factory 
which bears the name of the Panama 
Glove Co. and is located at 3 1 2-3 1 6 
East 37th Street. The plant is grow- 
ing rapidly and the Panama Gloves 
are carried by all the leading De- 
partment stores. Mr. Johanson is 
an enthusiastic believer in the future 
advancement of Los Angeles and 
will make this city his home. 

EMIL F. JOHNSON, New York 
City, Chemist 

Very prominent in Swedish So- 
ciety has been grand master of the 
Swedish Mon Lodge Bredablick; 
President of the Swedish-American 
Engineer Club; President of the New 
York Aid Society; President of the 
Old Peoples' Home at Eto was New 
York mill inspector for many years. 
Has done a great deal for the prog- 
ress of his countrymen and his fifty 
years' birthday last year was cele- 
brated with a great public festival 
attended by participants from al- 
most every state in the Union. 

CAPT. ERIC JOHNSON 

A veteran of the Civil War, was 
born in Vestmanland, July 15th, 
1838. Wtih his parents he came to 
the United States in 1 846. The fam- 
ily resided for a while in New York 
and different places in Illinois, final- 
ly locating in Bishop Hill, III., where 
he received his education. He joined 
the army September 16th, 1861, 
and was appointed lieutenant of 
Company D of the 5 7th regiment. 
He was promoted to the rank of 
Captain after the battle of Shiloh. 
In 1 864 and 1 865 he was editor and 
publisher of the Galvo Union at 
Galva, 111. 

We are sorry we did not get his 
photograph in time for this album. 



German Hospital 
Society 

Hospital, 45 3 South Soto St. 
Boyle Heights 

Best equipped Hospital for 
Private Patients. Prices reason- 
able. Attendance the best. 

Send your Patients to this 
place and you will be pleased. 

Ward beds, $14.00 per week. 

Rooms, $ I 7.00 per week. 

Single beds in room, $20 to 
$25 per week. 

mm®* 

Modern 
European 




822 WEST SIXTH ST. 



HOTEL LEE 

WILLIAM B. CLARK, Proprietor 

Convenient to Shopping District and Theatres 

Tariff, $1.00 and Up, with Bath $1.50 and Up 

"THE HOUSE OF COMFORT" 



Sunset Main 1585 
Home Phone 10743 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 






COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

NEW TURNER HALL CAFE 

319 South Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

O^O^o^0^o:^o^o::v O v v . v v v o^o^ooo ■■: v v v O 0:>O^O^O^O^C' 

THE HOSPITAL OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN 

ORANGE AND WITMER STS., LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
TELEPHONES: 10831, Main 6030 

The finest Hospital in 
Southern California 

Concrete Building 

Absolutely Fireproof 
Rates Reasonable 

Location Ideal 
Easily Accessible 

Thoroughly Modern 

mm 

HOME 10778 BROADWAY 2655 

CLOSE IN HOTEL AND APARTMENT HOTEL 

HOTEL PERCIVAL AND APARTMENTS 

D. P. STONE, Proprietor 

845 SOUTH HILL STREET 

J. A. Riley, Manager LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 




GEORGE LARSON, R. V. O. 

Jeweler, San Francisco. Was 
grand marshal of the Swedish Day 
at the Panama-Pacific International 
Exposition, San Francisco, 1915. 

EDWIN A. LEAF 

Was born in Jonsired, Sweden, 
and after completing his elementary 
school work in Gottenburg, learned 
his trade as cabinetmaker in Stock- 
holm, where he received a gold 
medal and diploma for artisanship 
in his trade. Mr. Leaf came to Bos- 
ton, Mass, 1882. Came to Los An- 
geles, 189 7, and established his oWn 
cabinet shop, 1905 and is well 
known for his creative ability and 
skill in cabinet work. Mr. Leaf is 
a charter member of Swedish Am. 
Nat'l League and past president and 
a member of Woodmen of the World 
and Order of Red Men and has often 
been honored by his fellow country- 
men both in the East and West. He 
has always been very active in the 
Swedish colony in furthering the 
welfare of the Swedes. 

CARL T. LILJENWALL 

Born in Sweden April 4, 1 889. 
Came to Los Angeles two years 
ago. Received scholarship from the 
Royal Agricultural Department in 
Sweden, and came to this country to 
pursue his studies. He is now con- 
nected with the University of South- 
ern California, studying agricultural 
and chemistry. He is financial sec- 
retary of the Swedish Lodge "Scan- 
dia V. O." He is the assistant re- 
cording secretary of the Los Angeles 
Executive Committee for the "Swed- 
ish Day** Celebration. 

THORALF L. NERDRUM 

Born in Kolka, Finland. Receiv- 
ed his education at the University in 
Helsingfers. Came to Los Angeles 
1912, accepted a position with the 
Los Angeles Investment Co. and 
soon afterwards he started the well- 
known real estate firm, Anderson 
and Nerdrum, of which he now is 
sole owner. Mr. Nerdrum is presi- 
dent of the Harmony, Finlandia, 
secretary of the National League and 
member of Nordstjerman, V. O. 



C. J. NORDQUIST, Contractor and 
Builder 

Was born in Westergotland, 
Sweden. He came to the United 
States in 1 888 and located in St. 
Paul, Minn., where he remained un- 
til he left for Los Angeles in 1894, 
at which place he has resided ever 
since. He married Jenny Benson in 
1892. To this union were born two 
children, Carroll and Norman. 

Mr. Nordquist has always taken a 
great deal of interest in everything 
that is Swedish. You can at all times 
count on him when anything is to 
be done to further the good name 
of our Swedish Colony. He is a 
charter member of the Swedish- 
American National League. In 
business he has been quite Success- 
ful. As a matter of fact, he ranks 
as one of the largest Swedish contrac- 
tors in the city. He has built some 
of the finest residences to be seen 
in Southern California. He is treas- 
urer of the Committee for the Swed- 
ish Day. 

JOHN NORRBOM 

Born April 8, 1869, in Sweden. 
Emigrated to the United States in 
1890 and located in Arlington, N. 
J. In 1907 went to Cuba, but re- 
turned to the United States after 
one year. Came to California short- 
ly after his return, and located in 
San Diego, living there until he came 
to Los Angeles in 1911. He is an 
active member of the Swedish Bap- 
tist Church. 

REV. OSCAR FR. LINDSTRUM 

Born in Sweden, November 9, 
185 7. Came to America together 
with his parents in 1869. He was 
ordained Deacon by Bishop Force of 
Bishop Hill in 1881, and as an Elder 
in 1896. He has served as pastor 
of the Swedish M. E. Church in Min- 
nesota, Illinois, and in Jamestown, 
N. Y. He was District Superinten- 
dent in Texas for six years. He came 
to Los Angeles in the Fall of last 
year. Rev. Lindstrum graduated 
from the Theological Seminary in 
Evanston, Ills., in 1886; married Lot- 
tie H. Peterson from Keokuk, Iowa 
in 1882. 



Business Wants You 




C. WESTON CLARK, 
Sec'y & Mgr. since 1904. 



For bright, capable, well-trained 
young men and women, the de- 
mand for our graduates exceeds 
the supply. But you must be 

Prepared 

Our Specialties are the Short, Effi- 
cient Courses in Accounting, Short- 
hand, Typewriting, Stenotypy, 
Salesmanship, Advertising, Span- 
ish, Office Machines, etc. 



Send for Announcement of 
Courses 



327 W. 8th 
at Hill St. 




Main 3236 
F2I96 



Oldest, Largest and Most Helpful Commercial School in the 
Southwest. Connected with Heald's in 12 Cities. 



ALEXANDER OLSSON, 
and Publisher 



Editor MIKAEL SAMUEL, R. V. O. 



Born in Howard, Sweden, Feb. 
2 7, 1868. Learned the printing 
trade while at home. Came to San 
Francisco in the spring of 1 889. Got 
position as foreman on the paper he 
now owns in 1890 and became a 
partner with Ernest Skarstedt, then 
the owner of Westkersten, 1894, un- 
til he became the sole owner in 
1896. Olsson is a good writer and 
speaker and he has done more per- 
haps than any other to keep 
the Swedes together around San 
Francisco. The columns of his 
paper are always open for the inter- 
ests of the Swedish people. A good 
deal of credit can be contributed to 
him for the successful participation 
by the Swedes in the Fair of last 
year. 

P. M. PAULSON 

Delegate from the Swedish-Ameri- 
can Patriotic League in San Fran- 
cisco to the Swedish Day Celebra- 
tion in San Diego. It is now thirty 
years since Mr. Paulson first visited 
Los Angeles. He is a building con- 
tractor and has also been engaged in 
that business at San Diego in 1887. 

He*is now engaged in building of 
three large factories in West Berke- 
ley and a very large factory at Free- 
port, Texas. 

Mr. Paulson is very well known 
on the Pacific Coast. He was born 
in Sweden in 1863 and came to the 
United States in 1882. 

B. F. RANDALL 

Born in Sweden, a son of Rev. 
Randall of Karlskoga Vermland, 
and a grandson of the composer, A. 
Randall. Received his collegiate 
education in Sweden. Came to this 
country in 1900, and to Los Angeles 
in 1 904. He first devoted himself 
to journalism in Eureka and Los An- 
geles. He is now an engineer in the 
employ of the Los Angeles Gas & 
Electric Corporation. He was mar- 
ried in 1905 to Littze Carlson, and 
has two children. He is a member 
of the Swedish Lutheran Evangeli- 
cal Church. 



(Royal Order of Vasa, First Clas9, 
conferred by the King of Sweden.) 
Flas been Swedish Commissioner to 
many International Expositions; 
General Secretary to the King Oscar 
Jubilee Committee; Associate Mem- 
ber of the Swedish-American En- 
gineers Club; Director of the New 
York Swedish Aid Society, and rep- 
resented in the United States the 
Swedish Export Society and the 
Tourists Society. 

In 1895 he was sent to Europe as 
Special Commissioner by the Nation- 
al Association of American Manu- 
facturers to investigate the possibil- 
ities of American export. His report 
was published and sent by the As- 
sociation to thousands of factories in 
the United States. 

He has traveled extensively and 
has been a liberal contributor to 
Swedish newspapers. Is a Free Ma- 
son • and membe rof Drott of V. O. 



DR. P. O. SUNDIN 






Born in Jamtland, Sweden, 1877. 
Came to the United States together 
with his parents when only a boy of 
eleven years, or in 1 888. He first 
finished the grammar department of 
the public schools, and afterwards 
finished the high school course 
through a private teacher, then en- 
tering the University of Southern 
California, graduating with high hon- 
ors in 1907. Dr. Sundin has a very 
large practice, and it can be said of 
him that he has a host of real friends 
owing, not only to his being a suc- 
cessful physciian and surgeon, but 
also on account of his congenial, 
pleasant and charitable disposition. 



MINNIE C. WILSON 

Born in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Ed- 
ucated in Denver Public Schools, 
Bethany College, Kansas, Columbia 
University, N. Y. Musician and 
singer; engaged as soloist in one of 
large churches in city. Very active 
society worker; President of the 
Swedish Ladies' Club of Los An- 
geles. 




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CONRAD P. OLSON 
Attorney at Law- 
Portland, Oregon 



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EMIL HOGBERG 
Contractor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



LOS ANGELES CREAMERY COMPANY 

Producers of and Dealers in All Dairy Products • 

1120-1190 Towne Ave. 
Main Office Ice Cream Department 

Home 10753 Main 7724 F 6863 Main 895 

Milk, Cream, Butter, Fer-Mil-Lac 

ICE CREAM 

Special prices on Ice Cream to Churches, Societies, etc. 

+OOXOXOXOX0t&X<>X<>XO :0#0#0#0#0 

NATIONAL SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Established 1905 

A completely equipped and the most modern and thoroughly practical school 

for training expert auto mechanics, machinists, and chauffeurs 

on the Pacific Coast 

Special courses. Low rates. We welcome Swedish students 

807-81 1 So. Figueroa Street Los Angeles, Calif. 












• 


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iHr0. pijfleb? 1§mtat 

A 3ffrirub of thr &nir&iBtj Jlrnpl* 

Honorary Member of the Royal Commission 
of Swedish Exhibit in San Francisco, 1915 





HOTEL VAN NUYS 

Main and Fourth Streets 
Los Angeles 

B. W. THOMPSON, A. J. PEDERSEN. Managers 

C. L. Lindberg Music Company 

Pianos, Phonographs, Band and Orchestra Instruments 

Expert Instrument Repairing. We make and repair Accordeons 
(Special cash bargains in used Instruments) 

2 1 9 West Second Street LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

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o 

Steam Heat Automatic ft PHONE F 3939 A. B. OLSON, Proprietor 

Private Baths with Showers Elevator V 

Private Phones Service S~\l All 

Phones: Main 2901, Home A 1748 UlSOIl ./I p(2 7777767? JS 

AM * r+f\Kl U/^TI-i 8 Furnished Rooms and Housekeeping 

IVIAbUN MOTEL Rooms 

LOUIS VALIN, Proprietor g Two . Room Apartments with Private Bath 

Rates: $1.00 per day and up; $5.00 per £ A „ sunny rofJms Wlth electric Hght and 

week and up gag heating , E veryt h n ig new. 

Free Bus from Depots g Reasonable rent 

746 South Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 3£ i? v • tl d ■ 

™ . ,. , „ ^ fj \l Years in 1 hat business 

lake Seventh Street car at Depot, get off at 

Main and go half block South Q I I 46 San Julian Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

;-. 

TRAVEL BY AUTO 

Leaving Los Angeles daily 8 a. m., 11 :30 a. m., 2 p. m., 4 p. m. 
Fresno, $7.50 Bakersfield, $4.50 Taft, $4.50 Frisco, $1 1.00 

WESTERN AUTO STAGE CO., Inc. 

525 South Spring Southern Hotel 1031 Eye Street 







HELS 



Got tfreo 

yANDCftSON 




Member of the Committee 



IF YOU DO LIVE 

in the City or in the Country 

It Does Really Pay 

to get your Clothes Made to Order 

By a Good 
Swedish Tailor 



OSCAR J. FLENSBURG 

Importing Tailor 

Room 201-202 Henne Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 
I 22 West 3rd Street Home Phone F 6585 



Ladies' Men's 
Tailoring 



Always the Latest 



A Perfect Fit 



SUITS $30.00 AND UP 



If you decide to have something better and more up to date for 
the same money see Oscar Flensburg. 



IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GOODS IN STOCK 



in 



> 



3 






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o 




WE Wish to Express Our Thanks for the Privilege 
of Extending in this Program, Our Invitation 
to YOU, to Take Advantage of the Complete and 
Helpful Home Furnishing Service Afforded by Our 
Extensive Store. 



Every home-furnishing need is supplied through 
our many departments. The complete outfitting 
and maintenance of your household can be done 
here, all under one roof, to best advantage. We offer 
also the convenience of accommodating terms or a 
monthly charge account — whichever you prefer. 

Be a Barker Bros, patron and your home furnish- 
ing will be a complete satisfaction. 





Complete Household and Office Furnishers 

724 to 738 South Broadway Los Angeles, Cal. 

Mr. George A. Cheney 

(Formerly of Hotel Del Coronado) 

announces to his friends and patrons that he has assumed the 
management of the 

Cristobal Cafe 

and is prepared to offer the best of service to 

Exposition Guests 

Luncheon, 1 2 to 2 p. m. Dinner, 6 to 12 p. m. 

Special attention to private dinner parties by appointment 

Sunday evening suppers at 75c — a special feature 

Music — Dancing 



Lauritz Brothers 

WILL MOVE 

To the most up-to-date quarters in Los Angeles 

Locating in the 

UNIQUE BUILDING 

729 South Broadway 

Los Angeles, CaL 

on the 1 st of August, 1916 




E. K. ALBRECHT Phone F 7688 Home F6397 Main 297 

Lessee DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE 









We are in the Heart of the City 



Pi j j # General Overhauling and Repairing 

aimer Mouse « 



Hot and Cold Running Water in 
Every Room 

$2.00 and up per week 



5 38 South Wall Street 
Los Angeles 



EMPIRE GARAGE 



FORD EMERGENCY STATION 

Expert in Attendance 



Carbon Removed, 50c per Cylinder 








Towing Inside City Limit Free 



| Autos Washed and Polished, 

Transient 50c to $1.00 g Storage 

All work guaranteed Rates reasonable 





g 739-45 SOUTH LOS ANGELES STREET 

§ LOS ANGELES, CAL. 





Sunset Phone Steam Heat 

Main 3 434 Private Shower Baths 

Private Exchange Connecting All Rooms 

Hotel Jovita 

A. F. MANTZ, Manager 

New Modern Beautifully Furnished 

Hot Water Night and Day Outside Rooms 

Rates: Detached Bath, 75c up; with Pri- 
vate Bath, $ 1.50 up 

726 South Spring §treet, Bet 7th and 8th 
Los Angeles, California 



Home Phone A 6675 



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Macsontile Cafeteria 

AUG. ESSIG, Proprietor 
The Ideal Spot of German-American 

HOME COOKING 

SAN FERNANDO BUILD1NQ 

(Down Stairs) 

Corner Fourth and Main 

LOS ANGELES 

acBHOBaa a a o a o 

W. L. GRAY, President 

E. F. WALSH, Vice-President 

E. V. GRAY, Secretary 

Hotel Huntington 

New Reinforced Concrete Building 
European Plan 

CAFE IN CONNECTION 

Corner Eighth and Main Sts. 
$1.00 and Up Without Bath Phones: Home A 3458, Broadway 5206 

$1.50 and Up With Bath LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

•O^O^O v v v v v v v :■■•:* v'OOO^O^O^O^O^ 

NOTICE — Swedish Society Hotel 
Headquarters at Los Angeles — 

5 th and Los Angeles Streets 
LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

HOTEL BALTIMORE 

FIREPROOF 

Enroute to and from (San Diego) Exposition 
Free Auto Bus — -Cafe 

RATES : 
Single, 75c-$1.00; double, $1, $1.50 

With Bath 

Single, $l.50-$2.00; double, $2-$2.50 

HESS & COLOPY, Proprietors 

OVER 100 ROOMS 

Srtictly Modern - Brand New 

A high-class Hotel for refined people, where the management anticipates 
the wants and every requirement of every guest. 

Headquarters for all New Yorkers An Ideal Hotel for the Lady traveling alone 

Large, utside, Sunny Rooms, especially equipped for Tourists. Splendid Ground- 
floor Lobby, fronting on two streets; also Ladies' Lobby. Quiet, Home-like, 
Central. LOW PRICES. Hot and cold running water; steam heat 
Room with privilege of bath (both tub and shower), 75c to $1.50 for one or two persons. 
Also few single rooms at 50c. Rooms with private bath, $1.50 to $2.00 
for one or two persons Weekly rates, $3.00 and up 
Located in the New Hotel District — 10 minutes' ride to Exposition 
Walking distance to Theatres and Stores — I blk. from New Post Office 
Two blocks from Million-Dollar Theatre — 4 blks. from Santa Fe Depot 
4 Blocks East ond Broadway UNION AND E STREETS I block South on Union 

FREDERIC WILSON, Manager FREE BUS Sunset Phone, Main 5736; Home 3159 

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 




The NEW HOTEL ALBANY 




Indian Girls 



Jftl _ •< A * i I 

Scene at Warner's Springs 



I 
O 



We Can Recommend 

C. A. RYDELL 

1914 Bonsallo Ave. 
Telephone 25329 



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5. /. JACOBSON 

Established 1887 

WATCHMAKER AND 
JEWELER 



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o 



Diamonds 
PAPER HANGING, PAINTING | Wedding & a,,^ Rings 

First Class Watch Repairing 



AND DECORATING 



a 



First Class Work. Only Best | 
Material Used 



5 

440 South Hill Street 
Los Angeles, Cal. 




T.LNERDRUM 

REAL ESTATE AND 
INSURANCE BROKER 



628 San Fernando Bldg. 

Home Phone F2314 

FIRST MORTGAGE LOANS 
SOLICITED 



Fire, Accident and 



Life I 



nsurance 



Member of Committee 

Written in Reliable Companies 
COME AND SEE ME 

Swedish Directory 



The Swedish people of Los Angeles have for a long time been in 
need of a directory giving the names, address, occupation and tele- 
phone numbers of all their countrymen. 

To date we have received 6,000 names. If your name has not 
been sent in please do so at once. Also tell your friends to do the same. 

T. L. NERDRUM 

628 San Fernando Bldg., Los Angeles 



Advertisements solicited and appreciated. 



G. E. STITH 

Phones: 
A 5690 Broadway 3601 



P. P. PAULSON g 
I 

s 



B<"tfM Cafeteria 

(Inc.) 

Continuous service from 6:30 a. m. to 
8:00 p. m. 



5 

S Home Phone F6784 Hours: 9 to 12, ] to 5 



| 

1 Dr. Adam Carlson 

o 

i 
1 

8 



DENTIST 

Office: 

222 MASON BUILDING 



SWEDISH HEALTH BREAD 

El 
524-26-28-30-32-34 South Hill St. 

Opp Central Park, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone Main 5579 
A 6473 



i 

W Fourth and Broadway Los Angeles, Cal. 

a 
8 

a 

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8 



Best of Service 
Prices Reasonable for All 




ISSIOM CAFE 

Formerly at 31 I West Fifth Street 
GIURAS & MATULICH 

FINEST AND BEST PLACE TO 
EAT IN THE CITY 



527 South Spring Street 



Los Angeles 





CARL STEELE 



HELGA STEELE 



Proprietors 

SWEDISH-AMERICAN BAKERY 

Sell all kinds of 

Homemade Bread, Spisbrod, Zwiebacks, Cake and Coffee Bread 

4215 VERMONT AVE. 

1 



IF YOU SMOKE 

Always go and see 

Oscar Anderson 

The only Swedish Cigar Dealer 
in Los Angeles 

Meet your friends at 
Oscars 

417 SOUTH SPRING STREET 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



TheP 



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anama Ulove 



If your gloves are a Panama Make, 
You may be sure they won't easily break. 
Besides, their gloves are such a perfect nt, 
They're bound to make a hit. 

Yes, the Panama Gloves are sure a treat, 
And for Novelties they can't be beat, 
For in every skin, color and style 
They're ahead of the others a mile. 



Panama Gloves are to be had at 
all the leading Department Stores. 
When buying Gloves always demand 
a "Panama." 




Copyright by Katherine Tingley 
Raja Yoga College and Temple of Peace, International Theosophical Headquarters, Point Loma 

INTERNATIONAL THEOSOPHICAL HEADQUARTERS 

The grounds of the International Theosophical Headquarters are open 
to visitors from I a. m. to 12 noon, and from I p. m. to 4 p. m. on week 
days and from 1 p. m. to 4 p. m. on Sundays. 

Every afternoon (except Sundays) from 3 to 4 o'clock, outdoor musical 
and other programs will be given by the pupils of the Raja-Yoga College and 
Academy and students of the Isis Conservatory of Music. 

THE THEOSOPHICAL BUILDING AT THE PANAMA-CALI- 
FORNIA INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 

is the second building to the right (southwest) from the Spreckels Outdoor 
Organ, Exposition Grounds. 

THEOSOPHICAL PUBLICATIONS AND 
INFORMATION BUREAU 

330 BROADWAY 
Next to main entrance U. S. Grant Hotel. Standard Theosophical Literature 

for sale 



For Reception at International Theosophical Headquarters, June 26, see 
Program on other page. 

Special Arrangements for Transportation of Svenska Dagen Guests. Leave 
U. S. Grant Hotel at 1 p. m. 



J. T. EXGMARK FRANK GUSTAFSON # 

THE SHOE DOCTORS 

772 Fourth Street, Corner of F 
SAN DIEGO. CAL. 

We use the Goodyear Machinery. It is the best ^ 
made and will doctor your Shoes to 

perfection 3J 

We doctor the Shoes while you wait, and we 
know you'll be pleased 



WILLIAM McCREESH 
Merchant Tailor 






322 C Street 



Home Phone 1215 SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA # 



New— Modern— Fireproof Outside Sunny Rooms 
Hot and Cold Water Free Baths 

HOTEL VEGA 

MRS. JOHN BORGH, Prop. 

50c, 75c and $1.00 per Day 

Special Weekly Rates 

Telephone Main S372 

620 Third St. (Near H) SAN DIEGO, CAL. 

Absolutely Fireproof, Absolutely Modern 
Free Garage Centrally Located 

HOTEL MARTIN 

RATES: $1.00 per Day and Up; Very Reason- 
able Rates by Week 

Free bus meets all boats and trains 

Seventh Street, Bet. Broadway and E 

Main 2064 

Mrs. Florence G. Mahoney. Prop. San Diego, Gal. 



South 6702 



RELIABLE CARPET WORKS 1 



W. J. BURTON, Proprietor 

CARPETS AND LINOLEUM 

Cleaned, Renovated, Refitted and Laid 

Expert Workmanship 



% 



1806 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES ^ 

03=0^0^000 D ■:• ■:• •:■ : 

Lady Attendant 



Phones: Home 23901 
Main 7679 



J. H. RIEDEMAN 

Funeral Director and Embalmer 



1430 South Main Street 



Home 23716 K Elegantly Furnished Rooms; Hot and Cold Water 
:& Phone in Every Room; Steam Heat 

Stop at THE NEW KINGSTON 

European Plan 

E. A. HOFF, Proprietor 

Rates $1.00 a Day and Up; with Private Bath, 

$1.50 per Day and Up; Elevator Service 

Free Auto Bus 

Center Shopping District 

Home Phone 2358; Pacific, Main 3678 

1161 FIFTH STREET SAN DIEGO, CAL. 

Home Phone 4779 Main S86 

THE BURNAP HOTEL 

In the Centre of the City 

238 BROADWAY 
SAN DIEGO. CALIFORNIA 

Los Angeles, Cal. All cars pass the door 









PASADENA: 
Colorado 1S60 



LOS ANGELES: 
Home F 1546; Main 4938 



Get a 



W. B. STIRDIVANT 

Manager 

PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

Of Hartford, Connecticut 



908-10 Baker-Detwiler Bldg. LOS ANGELES 

HARRY NOBLE 






SOUVENIR HAT 

Wear it on the trip 
It is nifty and nice 

Only costs $1.00 

Write to 

HERMAN BOSTROM 

424 MARSH-STRONG BUILDING 
LOS ANGELES 



THE LIMIT RESTAURANT 

CORNER BROADWAY AND FRANKLIN 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



■...-.-.-.. ..•:,.' 

ANTONE SUK g Steam Heat Hot and Cold Water 

Phones: Main 4630, Home 4342 



s 



HOTEL WHITE HOUSE 

1053 SECOND STREET 

(Just off Broadway) 

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Main 3948 



QUALITY EATS % Free Telephone in Each Room Rates $1.00 Up 




Top Row, from Left to Right — P. Rosell, A. Lauritz, A. Nelson, T. Nerdrum, D. Dahlin, C, Benson. 
Bottom Row, from Left to Right — £. Ohlund, H. Bostrom, J. Axelson, G. Gustafson, A. Dahlim. 
The Lower Left Corner — A. Hyberg. Lower Right Hand Corner — H. Berggren. 



S. S. S. HARMONY 

By David Dahlin, Secretary 

The Swedish Singing Society Harmony is a little jewel among the Swedish 
Societies of Los Angeles. 

Thousands of persons of all nationalities have been present at and 
greatly enjoyed the concerts and festivals during the past year, not only in 
Los Angeles, but also in Pasadena and San Pedro and now in San Diego. 

The S. S. S. Harmony began its life under great difficulties and its present 
success is therefore so much more appreciated. It was no easy task to gather 
together good singers, and more difficult yet to procure the right director. 

Much credit is due our present song leader, Mr. John Axelson, and thanks 
is also due the different song leaders before him. 

All concerts and festivals have been arranged by the Financial Board ; 
the chairman for same is Mr. Herman Bostrom, who has devoted a great deal 
of his time to this work and he deserves thanks for his splendid arrangements 
which always worked out so satisfactory to the financial and popular successes 
of the society. 



We have four Honorary members: Consul S. Eckdahl, Mr. Olof John- 
son, Mr. Percy Nelson and Mr. Alfred Haij. 

Our President is Thoralf Nerdrum; first vice president, N. H. Berggren; 
second vice president, E. Ohlund; secretary, D. Dahlin; treasurer, Axel Ny- 
berg; financial secretary, A. Dahlin; guard, E. Johnson. 

Leader, John Axelson; Assist- 
ant Leader, G. Gustafson. 

Financial Board: Herman Bos- 
trom, chairman; C. Benson, Alfred 
Nelson, E. Ohlund, D. Dahlin, A. 
Dahlin. 

Committee on Music: J. Ax- 
elson, G. Gustafson, P. Rosell, T. 
Nerdrum, D. Dahlin. 

In San Diego we are the male 
chorus, with good comrades from 
San Diego City helping us out. 

Miss H. Esbjornson, whose 
photo is on the same page with us, 
was voted the most popular girl at 
our last concert and received a lov- 
ing cup from the singers. 




o o o o o o o o^o^o^o^o^o:>i' .-:• 

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SECOND AND B STREETS 
T. N. PETERSON, Prop. 

The only Swedish hotel proprietor 
in San Diego 



SAMHKO 

«nt 1 




MODERN OUTSIDE ROOMS ONLY 

Rates 75c a Day and up 

with Private Bath $1.50 up 

Special Rates by Week or Month 



Telephones 
Home 1311 or 1131; Main 3447 



HOTEL HARVARD j The San Diego Hotel 



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i 



ON BROADWAY 



A San Diego's New, Modern, Fireproof Hotel 



2 75 rooms artistically furnished; every 
modern convenience, comfort and good 
service. 

Large, airy Sample Rooms; spacious 
Lobby and Mezzanine, Sun Parlor and 
Roof Garden with fine Marine view. 

The San Diego is centrally located on 
BROADWAY. Convenient to the shops 
and theaters. All car lines pass the hotel. 
Ideal for tourists and commercial travelers. 
Our new White Star bus meets all trains 
and steamers, and will convey you FREE 
to our hotel. 



Rates, $1.00 per Day and Up 

The Largest and Finest Popular-priced 
Hotel in San Diego 



O E. D. Miller and Sam S. Porter, Proprietors 



SAVE 




HAVE 



Corner of Fifth and F Streets 

4% Interest on Term Savings 

Safety Deposit Boxes, $2.00 per year; Foreign Exchange; Mexican 

Money Bought and Sold; Escrows and Collections Handled 



W. S. Dorland, President 
L. A. Blockman, Vice-Pres. 



Sam Ferry Smith, Vice-Pres. 
O. E. Darnall, Cashier 



o#o=::=o=>; 



Compliments from 

San Diego Steam Laundry 



GOTTFRED ANDERSON 

Members of the Committee 



J. ANDERSON 



Compliments 

Continental National Bank 

Ninth and Spring Streets 
Scandinavian Patronage Solicited 

MR. MAN : 

If you want clothes for yourself, your boy, your wife, 
your daughter — clothes of style and value, and you 
want satisfaction guaranteed — Then, Mr. Man, you 
want to trade with us. 



HARRIS & FRANK j ^tt 1 4S°sSSh s P ri ng 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



■:• ■:• : CWaftC&Q 



T. W. WESTERLUND 

With 

CLANCEY & PROVOST 

965 4th Street 

San Diego, California 



W. A. LAIDLAW, Prop. 



GEO. L. MAYNE, Mgr. 



NEW PALACE HOTEL 

American and European 

Rooms without Private Bath 

$1.00 and $1.50 per day single 
$1.50 and $2.00 per day double 

Rooms with Private Bath 

$2.00 and $2.50 per day single 
$2.50 and $3.00 per day double 

Meals Table d'hote 50c each 
Special weekly rates 

The New Palace is a synonym for everything that's cheerful, 
comfortable and homelike 

Garage convenient to hotel 

NEW PALACE HOTEL 

San Diego, Cal. 

Northwest Corner 5 th and Elm Streets 

%®m •:■ •:■ o a D o::^^0^Ck:=0^O^00O#o -:• •:■ m •:-.•:• a •:• ooo 

B 

Sunset Main 704 Private Booths j§ 

Home 253 7 for Ladies 




We guarantee the best luncheon in the 
city for 40c. Finest French dinner with 
wine every day for 75c. Sundays and Hol- 
idays, $1.00. 

Oyster Loaf Cafe 

G. Topuzes, Proprietor 

The only place of its kind in the city 
We serve fresh daily, Oysters, Clams, 

Crabs, Mussels, Shrimps and Lobsters. 
Fine Plank Steaks, Poultry, Game and 

Dairy Dishes our specialties. 

Liquors with all meals 



328-330 C Street- 
SAN DIEGO, 



■1114 Fourth Street 

CALIFORNIA 



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El Week O 
acriMonthoave 

In old age you cannot live on 
what you have made 

But 

What You Have Saved 



[CTl 

$1.00 opens a savings account with 

CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK 

1040 Fifth Street 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. 



U. S. Grant Hotel 

THE SWEDISH DAY HEADQUARTERS 
Centrally Located in San Diego, Calif. 



The Hotel that is noted for square dealing; prices always the same 

The Hotel that IS FIREPROOF 
Prices no higher than so-called fire-proof hotels 

Splendid Rooms $1.50 day, up 

Rates not raised during the Exposition 

JAMES H. HOLMES, Manager 
Formerly 1 9 Years with Hotel Green, Pasadena 

0=::=0::' ■:■■•:■ 3 © ■:•■:■ •:■ v 



Xotel St James 



W. D. CHURCH, Manager 



1 1 Stories 

Steel and Concrete 

Center of Business District 

European Plan 

Cafe in Connection 




RATES 

Room for I person, 

$1.00, $1.50, $2.00 
Room for 2 persons, 

$1.50, $2.00, $3.00 
Room with bath 

for I person, $1.50, 2.00, 3.00 
Room with bath for 2 

persons, $2.00, $2.50, $3, $4 

San Diego Headquarters for 
Automobilists 



6th Street between E and F 



See Our Beautiful Sun Parlor on Tenth Floor 



6TH STREET, between E and F Streets 



SAN DIEGO, CAL. 




l 'J 11 AWL; 



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VARIETY OF SHIPPING IN 'THE HARBOR OF THE SUN" 



HOTEL 



KNICKERBOCKER 



NEW AND MODERN 



Located in the heart of the Cafe, Theatre and 
Shopping Districts of San Diego 

Corner of Third and E Streets 

One block from U. S. Grant Hotel One-half block from the Plaza 

Good beds, beautifully furnished throughout 

RATES: $1.00 A DAY AND UP 

: 8 o v •:• :• 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

SOUTHERN TRUST 
and SA VINGS BANK 

"THE DEPARTMENTAL BANK" 

U. S. Grant Hotel Building 
San Diego, California 



THE LOFLING APARTMENTS 







The only Swedish 
apartment house in San 
Diego. 

We invite our coun- 
trymen. 



Modern in every particular. Surrounded by beautiful gardens and homes. Com- 
manding a beautiful view of ocean and bay. Apartments completely furnished, including 
silverware, linen, china, etc.; also gas, electricity, steam heat and telephone. A porter 
attends to the wants of the guests. Beautiful 2- and 3-room apartments for very reasonable 
rates by the month. Within easy walking distance of Exposition and center of city. No. 
6 car north to Juniper. 

Phones Home 4327, Main 6020 

Owners and Managers, Mr, and Mrs. A. Lofling 

Front and Juniper Streets 

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 
P a ■: •: a : : o ::^>O^oo0^O^o^o^0^0^ 

King George Hotel 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. 

We extend our best wishes for 
a successful celebration on Swed- 
ish Days, June 24, 25, 26. 

RATES - $1.00 AND UP 

STAN ANTHONY, Mgr. 

■:■ ■:• OX^O^v ■:■• :• : v ;o::o^0^0^ ■:• ■:• o^o^oo 

ED. L. PETERSON GEO. PETERSON 

Home 1591 Main 1853 

PETERSON BROS. 

We Manufacture and Repair 
Metal Tool Boxes, Lamps, Radiators, Hoods, Cowls, Tanks, Bucket Seats 

Fenders, Mudguards 
Expert Fender Repairing; we can duplicate any Fender. Welding and Brazing 

All work guaranteed 

AUTO SHEET METAL WORKS 




848-850 7TH STREET 



SAN DIEGO, CAL. 



HOTEL SANDFORD 

San Diego, California 

AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN 

Your hotel should be carefully chosen as it will add to or detract from the 
pleasure of your visit. The Hotel Sandford is a beautiful new hostelry that 
strongly appeals to discriminating people. It is located in the heart of things, 
is on the direct car-line to the Panama-California Exposition, and commands 
a superb view of bay and ocean. Free auto meets all trains and boats. 

150 OUTSIDE ROOMS 

Tariff 

One person — detached bath - $1.00 to $2.50 

Two persons — detached bath - $1.50 to $3.00 

One person — private bath - - $1.50 to $3.00 

Two persons — private bath - - $2.50 to $4.00 

Suites, parlor, bedroom and bath - $8.00 up 

F. S. SANDFORD, Managing Director 

Formerly Manager Majestic Hotel, New York Grand Hotel, Yokohama 



Special Rates g Home phone 2QQ7 Main 2 087 

Room and Board American or European g 

to Permanents. Excellent Home Cooking # 

For Two, $ I and Up •>'- 

V 

The JEWETT HOTEL f 

MRS. G. G. JOHNSON, Prop. 



Pacific Radiatior 



Best Beds in the City 





1 and Lamp Shop 



E. HERBERT 
o 



Mam 3436 S.W. Cor. Fourth and A Sts. 
Home 3 132 SAN DIEGO, CAL. 

& We are Pioneers in Repairing 

HOT LUNCH AT EXPOSI- . 

TION GROUNDS Radiators, Lamps, Wind Shields 

20C * Fenders, Hoods, Tanks, Etc., Etc. 



v^ompieie uinner 

35c 


1 


Our Work Fully Guaranteed v 


Oldest eating place on the grounds 
Clean, good; a square deal 




WHITE HOUSE CAFE 

On the Isthmus 


s 


224 B Street San Diego, Cal. 



WE PAY 

INTEREST MONTHLY 

at the rate of 3% per annum on your personal CHECK- 
ING ACCOUNT, for each month your balancce remains 
$200 or over. There is no penalty whatever for months 
it falls below that sum; you simply do not get interest 
such months. This plan applies to our regular Commer- 
cial Department accounts. 

— also — 
in the Savings Department, we pay 3% and 4% interest 
on all term deposits of $1 .00 or more and in this Bank 
your money starts to earn interest the very day it is de- 
posited no matter what your balance or what time of 
the month or year. 



BANK of COMMERCE 

and 

TRUST COMPANY 

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 

Capital $500,000.00 

Surplus $275,000.00 



New Southern Hotel 

J. M. ANDERSON, Owner-Proprietor 



Not the Largest but the Best 



RATES 

With Detached Bath With Private Bath 

Room for 1 person, $1.00 to $2.00 Room for 1 person, $1.50 to $3.00 

Room for 2 persons, $1.50 to $2.50 Room for 2 persons, $2.00 to $4.00 

Suites ... ......$4.00 to $7.00 

IN THE BUSINESS CENTER 

AT THE CORNER OF SIXTH AND B STREETS 
SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 

:■ : Q : •:■ o ■:■ D coo^OttO-:. •:• 

BOHEMIA CAFE 



FIRST CLASS MEALS 

CABARET ENTERTAINMENT FINE DANCING FLOOR 

First Street, Between B and C 
Phone Main 221 7 

Skandinavian Proprietor 

Greeting to my Swedish friends from 
GEORGE HANSON 




THE RATES of THE CHURCHILL 
are consistent with those desiring 
first class accommodations. The 
Churchill has 100 rooms, 50 with 

bath. 

Rooms en suite may be arranged 
for if desired. 

O. L. CHURCHILL, Owner 



Hotel 

Churchill 

9th and C Streets 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. 

Modern, Fireproof in every 
sense of the word. Catering 
to a particular class of trade. 



TARIFF 

For One For Two 

Without Bath, $1 $1.50 $1.50 $2 

With Bath $2 $2.50 $2.50 $4 

Cafe in connection with hotel. Free 
bus meets all trains. 

ED ALLEN, Manager 



•:■ v -roooo^O^Ooooo^: © o ■:■•:> o -:• ooo^oo 

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CABRILLO AND SANTA FE 



HAVANA CIGARS 



SENSENBRENNER & SONS 



Makers 



957-959 Fourth Street 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. 



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Rudder's Cafe 

AND BOHEMIAN GRILL 

HARRY RUDDER, Prop. 

"Down the Marble Stairs** 

Open from 6 a. m. to midnight. 
Music at dinner and after the theater 
by the Chicago Lady Quartet. Pop- 
ular priced bill-of-fare. Try our 35c 
week-day luncheon. 



El 

Main Entrance to Union Building 
Third and D Streets 
SAN DIEGO, CAL. 



TWO GOOD SAN DIEGO HOTELS 

OWNED AND OPERATED BY 

A SCANDINAVIAN 

Hotel Polhemus 

7th and C Streets 

1 00 rooms, steel and concrete building, in the centre 
of the shopping district 

Hotel Ford 

3rd and C Streets 

80 rooms, in the centre of the theatre and shopping 
district and a Gift Breakfast. See! 

Rates at both houses reasonable 
$ .75 or $1.00 for one 
$1.25 or $1.50 for two 

R. B. THORBUS, Proprietor and Manager 



MORGAN'S 
CAFETERIAS 

1047-1049 SIXTH STREET 

1033-1039 SECOND STREET 

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 

OPEN SUNDAYS 



500 Outside Room* "THE NEW MARVEL** Absolutely Fireproof 

GOLDEN WEST HOTEL 



One of the Finest Constructed Hotels in San Diego 




Hot and cold running water in each room. Steam heat. Large ground-floor lobby, 
1 1 0x88 feet. Plenty of shower and tub baths on each floor. Located in the heart of San 
Diego. First-class Restaurant and Cafe in Connection. 

Front room, 75c for one, $1.00 for two 

Side Rooms — Single, 50 cents Special rates by the week 

G Street, entire block from 3rd to 4th 

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 

Free Bus at all trains and boats NORR1S & MOORE, Props, and Mgrs. 

O^O^O^O^OOO^O^O^O^O^O^O^O : -■:■ :■ O^OOO^O^O^ 



F. SOLARI 



R. OLSON 



Saddlerock Grill 

SOLARI & OLSON, Proprietors 

A ROOMY, COMFORTABLE LUNCH COUNTER 
IN CONNECTION 



Come in and see Robert E. Olson. He is a member of the committee, 
formerly of Hotel del Coronado 



Telephones Main 1 4 
Home 2616 



Adjoining U. S. Grant Hotel 

1054-56 FOURTH STREET 
SAN DIEGO, CAL. 



HALSOHEM-BY-THE-SEA 



(A Swedish Health-Home) 



JPHHn Wm^" 1 


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Make your home at "Halsohem" while visiting the Exposition. Located 
on the beautiful San Diego Bay near Coronado Tent City and Hotel del 
Coronado. 

CHRONIC DISEASES ARE CURED BY NATURAL METHODS 

Write or call on 

DR. TELL J. BERGGREN 

624 Glorietta Boulevard, CORONADO, CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Coronado 4 1 7 

Free demonstrations, Physical Culture Classes, etc., every week day, at 1 1 a. m. 
Visitors are welcome at any time 

SCANDINAVIAN PHYSICIANS AND NURSES 

#0#C ■:• v o o::-0#--::=<X:Ow o o o o o o o ■: ■:• •:• •:• : 



Mnftcflaell's CalFetteiriia 



940 SEVENTH STREET, NEAR BROADWAY 

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 

Advertised from coast to coast by our satisfied guests. First in 
price, quality and service. The largest seating capacity and the best 
ventilated cafeteria south of Los Angeles. 

Equipped with a rest room, free telephones and ladies' and gen- 
tlemen's lavatories. 

You are cordially invited to Eat at Mitchell's when in San Diego 



Swedish Spisbrod Served 



AFTERNOON PROGRAM 
Two o'clock, International Theo- 
sophical Headquarters, Point 
Loma, Cal. 



EVENING PROGRAM 
Eight o'clock, Isis Theater, 4th 
Street between B and C, San 
Diego, Cal. 



POINT LOMA DAY, June 26, 1916 
RECEPTION AT THE INTERNATIONAL THEOSOPHICAL 

HEADQUARTERS 

By Madame {Catherine Tingley, Residents and Students 

SWEDISH FOLK DANCES 

By a Group of Junior Girls of the Raja-Yoga Academy 

MUSIC 

By the Raja-Yoga College Band 

OFFICIAL RECEPTION IN THE OPEN-AIR GREEK THEATER 

Addresses of Welcome 
By Officials and by Representatives of the Raja-Yoga College and Academy 

"THE LITTLE PHILOSOPHERS"— A Symposium 

By a Group of the Youngest Pupils of the Raja-Yoga School 

SONGS 

By the Raja- Yoga Internatonial Chorus 

TRIBUTE TO THE WORLD'S PEACE-MAKER,' KING OSCAR II 

By Madame Katherine Tingley 

RESPONSES 

RECEPTION 

AT 

ISIS THEATER 

& At 8 p. m. 







MUSIC PROGRAM 
By 
The Raja Yoga Interna- 
tional Orchestra and 
Chorus 

ADDRESSES OF 

Welcome 

By 

Mr. Nils Malmberg, 

Swedish Vice-Consul, 

San Diego 
Rev. Howard B. Bard 
Mme. Katherine Ting- 
ley, and others 

RESPONSES 
By 
Mr. G. Eckdahl, Swed- 
ish Vice-Consul, 
Los Angeles, 

And other Guests 



KATHERINE TINGLEY. Leader of the Universal Brotherhood 
and Theosophical Society throughout the World. 



Merchants National Bank 



Granger Block 



Fifth & Broadway 



SAN DIEGO, CAL. 



Capital $100,000.00 

Surplus and Profits (all earned) 600,000.00 

I -1 OR a period of twenty-three years this Bank has transacted a 
^ strictly commercial banking business and has declined to pay 
interest on deposits in any form. This conservative policy has enabled 
it to build up a Surplus Fund for the protection of its depositors larger 
than any other banking institution in the City of San Diego. 



Your Account — subject to Check — is Invited 



#NewIioteII&W 

l F|PEPR00f 

I ' 100 ROOMS 



Iff 



r^^-w^iviijj 



Special Prices 



New Building 

Within 1 block from 

la the Exposition 

and all points of in- 

Restaurant, Barber 
Shop, Drug and Curio 
Store located in the 
building, 

\ y >* -t located tourist 
hotel in San Piego* 

Entire Block on F 
Street, Opposite New 
Post Office, San Diego, 
California, 

Seventy -five cents, $1,00 and $1.25 per day Bath Privilege. $1.50 per day with Private Bath and 
Toilet, Above rates for room. No additional charge for two persons, this being special offer to intro- 
duce this New Hotel, We guarantee the highest grade Hotel accommodations for the money in San 
Diego, CHAS, F, WENZEL, Manager, 

HOTEL ROBERT E. LEE 



No inside rooms. Ev- 
ery room is light and 
bright, elegantly furn- 
ished, steam, heated, 
hot and cold water in 
each room, private and 
public baths. 



FREE BUS MEETS 
ALL TRAINS 




Modern 

Fireproof 

Centrally 
Located 



W. D. SAMPLE, Manager 

Corner Third and F Streets 



Rates — 75c per 
day and up 

Weekly rates 



SAN DIEGO, CAL. 



LAURITZ BROS. 

SWEDISH FOTOGRAPHERS 

OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR 

"SVENSKA DAGEN" 

Will make large panorama photos of different groups on the Swedish 

Day at San Diego, and orders can be given on the 

grounds or later by mail 



We have also made mostly all of the photographs used in 

this album 



IF YOU WANT SOMETHING REAL GOOD FOR LESS MONEY 



see 



LAURITZ BROS. 

UNIQUE BUILDING 
729 South Broadway Los Angeles, Cal. 



HOLLAND HOTEL I The NEW HOTEL LUBIN 



Attractions Most Modern 




D. Lubin Phone Main 4986 W. Lubin 
TARIFF 

Rooms with Toilet and Lavatory 

J Person, per day - - $1.00 

2 Persons, per day - - $1.50 



Rooms with Private Bath 

1 Person, per day 

2 Persons, per day 



$1.50 
$2.00 



Handsome New Building 
Every room an outside room 
Beautifully furnished 
Private toilet in every room 

First-Class Service 
Rates - - - $1.00 and up 

Connecting suites with private bath 

Fourth and B Streets 
San Diego, Cal. 

Muehleisen Tent & Awning Co. 

Inc. 



We quote Weekly and Monthly Rates 

LADIES' PARLOR 

Electric Elevator and Private Phones in 

Every Room; Elegant Lobby on 

Ground Floor 

Free Bus Meets All Trains and 
Steamers 

Corner Front and C Streets 
San Diego, Cal. 



TRADE 



HANUFACTURERS 



DIEGO, 



Fiching Tackle, Sails, Paulins, Tents 

Marine Hardware, Slickers 

Rope and Twine 







Awnings, Canvas Goods, Lawn and 
Camp Furniture 

753-55 FOURTH ST. 
Home 1382 Main 782 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. 




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i La Paloma 
1 Cafeteria 



g We cater to the 

discriminating public 




I ' 










1126 SIXTH STREET 



San Diego, Cal. 



The best of everything including 
efficient service, is our motto 



HOLLAND HOTEL I The NEW HOTEL LUBIN 



Attractions Most Modern 




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Handsome New Building 
Every room an outside room 
Beautifully furnished 
Private toilet in every room 

First-Class Service 
Rates - $1.00 and up 

Connecting suites with private bath 

Fourth and B Streets 
San Diego, Cal. 



Muehleisen Tent & Awning Co. 

Inc. 




Fkhing Tackle, Sails, Paulins, Tents 

Marine Hardware, Slickers 

Rope and Twine 



- 









^U-l 



Awnings, Canvas Goods, Lawn and 
Camp Furniture 

753-55 FOURTH ST. 
Home 1382 Main 782 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. 



D. Lubin Phone Main 4986 W. Lubin 
TARIFF 

Rooms with Toilet and Lavatory 

1 Person, per day - - $1.00 

2 Persons, per day - - $1.50 

Rooms with Private Bath 

1 Person, per day - - $1.50 

2 Persons, per day $2.00 

We quote Weekly and Monthly Rates 

LADIES' PARLOR 

Electric Elevator and Private Phones in 

Every Room; Elegant Lobby on 

Ground Floor 

Free Bus Meets All Trains and 
Steamers 

Corner Front and C Streets 
San Diego, Cal. 



La Paloma 
Cafeteria 

We cater to the 
discriminating public 



The best of everything , including 
efficient service, is our motto 



1 126 SIXTH STREET 
San Diego, Cal.